Frontmatter

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Title Page

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pp. i-iii

Copyright

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p. iv

Dedication

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pp. v-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

In researching and writing this book, we have received extraordinary help from a large number of individuals and organizations. Because the original manuscript was too long and detailed, we faced the difficult task of cutting it—by the end, in half. For..

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Prologue: Introducing the Twentieth Century

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pp. 1-6

At the dawn of the twentieth century, two articles flanked the front page of the New York Times. One focused on South Africa and the Boer War, the other on China, the Open Door policy, the prospects for trade, and the competition among nations. The Times anticipated the new century with barely...

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Chapter 1. What America Was: The Early Twentieth Century

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pp. 7-62

At the start of the twentieth century most Americans lived on farms or in small communities where, on an ordinary day, they would not encounter unfamiliar faces. Few things underscore the differences between America then...

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Chapter 2. The Paradox of Inequality in the History of Gender, Race, and Immigration

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pp. 63-125

In the last half of the twentieth century the Civil Rights movement and the Women’s movement swept across the United States. Although neither reached all its goals, each gained many of its objectives and, in the process, transformed the nation. Yet, in the...

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Chapter 3. Growing Up and Growing Old in a Century of Family Change

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pp. 126-170

In the early twentieth century, many Americans did not know exactly how old they were, and they did not care. The Census Bureau’s report on age statistics from the 1910 census cautioned readers:...

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Chapter 4. What America Is Becoming

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pp. 171-216

By 2000, everything had changed. Where more than 50 percent of the population in 1900 had lived in places with at most one thousand residents, these small communities were home to only 2 percent in 2000. Roughly 50 percent now lived in towns and cities of at least twenty-five thousand and 27 percent...

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Epilogue: What Does It Mean to Be an American?

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pp. 217-224

If science has undermined ideas of race, if intermarriage has blurred the meaning of ethnicity, if immigration has changed the geographic origins of the population, if America no longer can be described as black and white, if the vocabulary of group identity has been rendered obsolete, what, then, has happened...

Notes

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pp. 225-272

References

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pp. 273-334

About the Authors

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pp. 335-336

Index

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pp. 337-361