Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

About the Authors

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

We would first like to thank the Russell Sage Foundation for its generous support of the Detroit Arab American Study (DAAS) and the allied Detroit Area Study (DAS). We are grateful to administrators and staff at the Foundation for their patient cultivation...

Introduction

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pp. 1-32

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1. Citizenship and Crisis

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pp. 3-32

The terror attacks of September 11, 2001 have led to radical changes in American society, new laws and governmental agencies, new wars, and new ways of seeing the world. The U.S. military has invaded and now occupies two (formerly) sovereign nation-states; a war on terror....

Part 1: Community in Crisis

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pp. 33-100

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2. Arab American Identities in Question

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pp. 35-68

Detroit’s Arab communities have attracted global attention not only for their size, age, and cultural vibrancy, but also for their symbolically charged location between the West and the Arab Muslim world. As a geopolitical interface, located at the edges of what are widely...

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3. The Aftermath of the 9/11 Attacks

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pp. 69-100

National and international media often turn their attention to Detroit when exploring connections between the United States and the Middle East. So too do federal authorities. In the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, the “special relationship” between Arab...

Part 2: Beliefs and Bonds

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pp. 101-189

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4. Belief and Belonging

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pp. 103-134

“The more the immigrants enter into the religious life of America, the better and quicker they become Americans,” observed historian Philip Hitti in 1924 (121). He intended the statement as a criticism of the early Syrian immigrants to the United States, whose churches—Maronite...

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5. Values and Cultural Membership

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pp. 135-164

Arabs in Detroit take great pride in their traditions, customs, and values. The region is home to Arabs from across the Arab world, including Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Yemen, Egypt, the Gulf, and North Africa. Cultural values and traditions are a unifying force for this heterogeneous...

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6. Local and Global Social Capital

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pp. 165-189

The aspirations of many Arab Americans in the post-9/11 era reflect the tensions inherent in the meaning of citizenship in a diverse society (chapter 1, this volume). Consider, for example, a common theme that emerged from answers to an open-ended question in our survey...

Part 3: Political identity

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pp. 191-262

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7. Civil Liberties

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pp. 193-226

To the founding fathers, civil liberties were central to the way they understood their republic. They wanted to create a restrained government that guaranteed citizens the rights to privacy, individual discretion, and protection from abuse by authority. Not only did the Bill of Rights enshrine...

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8. Foreign Policy

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pp. 227-262

In 2003, as the U.S. army advanced into Iraq, protestors staged an antiwar rally in front of the Dearborn city hall. Hundreds of Arab American demonstrators held signs and cheered speakers. Just across the street was a second rally, also Arab American, where demonstrators announced...

Conclusion

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pp. 263-286

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9. The Limits of Citizenship

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pp. 265-286

In previous chapters of this book, we have shown that Detroit’s Arab and Chaldean communities are suspended precariously between two statuses: “not quite us” and “not quite them.” This predicament is related to all the issues of citizenship and crisis we have explored, and it should...

Index

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pp. 287-299