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Visualizing Secularism and Religion
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Over the past two decades secular polities across the globe have witnessed an increasing turn to religion-based political movements, such as the rise of political Islam and Hindu nationalism, which have been fueling new and alternative notions of nationhood and national ideologies. The rise of such movements has initiated widespread debates over the meaning, efficacy, and normative worth of secularism. Visualizing Secularism and Religion examines the constitutive role of religion in the formation of secular-national public spheres in the Middle East and South Asia, arguing that in order to establish secularism as the dominant national ideology of countries such as Turkey, Lebanon, and India, the discourses, practices, and institutions of secular nation-building include rather than exclude religion as a presence within the public sphere. The contributors examine three fields---urban space and architecture, media, and public rituals such as parades, processions, and commemorative festivals---with a view to exploring how the relation between secularism, religion, and nationalism is displayed and performed. This approach demands a reconceptualization of secularism as an array of contextually specific practices, ideologies, subjectivities, and "performances" rather than as simply an abstract legal bundle of rights and policies.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. pp. c-ii
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. iii-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introduction. Religious Nationalism as a Consequence of Secularism
  2. pp. 1-22
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  1. Part 1: Performances
  2. pp. 23-24
  1. 1. Subversion and Subjugation in the Public Sphere: Secularism and the Islamic Headscarf in Turkey
  2. pp. 25-46
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  1. 2. Islamic Visibilities, Intimacies, and Counter Publics in the Secular Public Sphere
  2. pp. 47-69
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  1. 3. Mirrors of Emancipation: Images of Sovereignty and Exile in the Balmiki Ramayana
  2. pp. 70-92
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  1. 4. Secularism, Islam, and the National Public Sphere: Politics of Commemorative Practices in Turkey
  2. pp. 93-110
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  1. Part 2: Mediations
  2. pp. 111-112
  1. 5. Mediating Secularism: Communalism and the Media Assemblage of Hindi-Urdu Film
  2. pp. 113-141
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  1. 6. The New Kid on the Block: Bahibb Issima (I Love Cinema) and the Emergence of the Coptic Community in the Egyptian Public Sphere
  2. pp. 142-173
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  1. 7. Talk Television: Reinventing Secular Muslims in the Era of Neoliberalism
  2. pp. 174-203
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  1. 8. The Visual/Textual Marginalization of “Muslim Women” in Secular Democratic India, 1985–2001
  2. pp. 204-224
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  1. Part 3: Politics of Spaces and Symbols
  2. pp. 225-226
  1. 9. Building Cities and Nations: Visual Practices in the Public Sphere in India and Lebanon
  2. pp. 227-257
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  1. 10. Sincan, A Town on the Verge of Civic Breakdown: The Spatialization of Identity Politics and Resistance
  2. pp. 258-280
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  1. 11. The Secular Icon: Secularist Practice and Indian Visual Culture
  2. pp. 281-307
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  1. 12. Spatial Representation of Sectarian National Identity in Residential Beirut
  2. pp. 308-334
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 335-340
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 341-348
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