Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Series Editpr's Preface

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pp. vii-viii

This is the ninth volume in a series of translations of The Oratory of Classical Greece. The aim of the series is to make available primarily for those who do not read Greek up-to-date, accurate, and readable translations with introductions and explanatory notes of all the surviving works and major fragments of the Attic orators of the classical...

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Translator's Acknowledgements

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pp. ix-ix

The introduction to the volume and the introductions to the individual speeches include, with alterations, material from the introduction to my book Demosthenes: On the Crown, published by Cambridge University Press. The material is reprinted here with the permission of...

Map of Greece, Macedon, and the Aegean

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pp. x-x

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Series Introduction: Greek Oratory

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pp. xi-2

From as early as Homer (and undoubtedly much earlier) the Greeks placed a high value on effective speaking. Even Achilles, whose greatness was primarily established on the battlefield, was brought up to be “a speaker of words and a doer of deeds” (Iliad 9.443); and Athenian leaders of the sixth and fifth centuries,1 such as Solon, Themistocles...

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Introduction to Demosthenes

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pp. 3-8

Since antiquity Demosthenes (384 –322 bc) has usually been judged the greatest of the Attic orators. Although the patriotic and nationalistic tenor of his message has been more highly regarded in some periods of history than in others, he is unique in his mastery of so many different rhetorical styles and his ability to blend them into a powerful...

Introduction to This Volume

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pp. 9-20

Demosthenes, Speeches 18 and 19

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pp. 21-22

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18. In Defense of Ctesiphon on the Crown

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pp. 23-113

Following his nearly victorious prosecution of Aeschines in 343 for misconduct on the Second Embassy (Dem. 19), Demosthenes was in a strong position.1 He continued his career on the premise that rapprochement with Philip was unachievable and that support against Philip should be sought from all quarters within and outside Greece...

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19. On the Dishonest Embassy

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pp. 114-216

Athens was at war with Macedon since 357, when Philip, recently acceded to the Macedonian throne, seized the northern Greek cities of Amphipolis and Pydna, which Athens considered within its sphere of influence. The Athenians made no headway, apart from repelling Philip’s attempt to seize Thermopylae in 352. Meanwhile Philip extended...

Appendix 1. The Spurious Documents from Demosthenes 18: On the Crown

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pp. 217-227

Appendix 2. Timeline

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pp. 228-230

Biblilography for This Volume

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pp. 231-234

Index

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pp. 235-244