In this Book

Transatlantic Women
summary
In this volume, fifteen scholars from diverse backgrounds analyze American women writers’ transatlantic exchanges in the nineteenth century. They show how women writers (and often their publications) traveled to create or reinforce professional networks and identities, to escape strictures on women and African Americans, to promote reform, to improve their health, to understand the workings of other nations, and to pursue cultural and aesthetic education. Presenting new material about women writers’ literary friendships, travels, reception and readership, and influences, the volume offers new frameworks for thinking about transatlantic literary studies.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Introduction: Transatlantic Studies and American Women Writers
  2. pp. xiii-xxviii
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  1. Part I: Tourism, Celebrity, & Reform: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Transatlantic Travel
  2. pp. 1-171
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  1. 1. A Flight from Home: Negotiations of Gender and Nationality in Frances Osgood’s Early Career
  2. pp. 3-20
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  1. 2. Catharine Maria Sedgwick Tours England: Private Letters, Public Account
  2. pp. 21-48
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  1. 3. Margaret Fuller’s "New-York Tribune" Dispatches from Great Britain: Modern Geography and the Print Culture of Reform
  2. pp. 49-70
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  1. 4. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Starring as Benevolent Celebrity Traveler
  2. pp. 71-88
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  1. 5. “A little private conversation . . . in her boudoir”: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Appearance at Stafford House in 1853: An Essay in Twelve Parts
  2. pp. 89-103
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  1. 6. Reluctant Celebrity: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Fanny Fern, and the Transatlantic Embodiment of Gender and Fame
  2. pp. 104-119
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  1. 7. Freedom and Grace: Harriet Jacobs in England
  2. pp. 120-135
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  1. 8. Great Exhibitions: Ellen Craft on the British Abolitionist Stage
  2. pp. 136-152
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  1. 9. A Summer in England: The Women’s Rest Tour Association of Boston and the Encouragement of Independent Transatlantic Travel for American Women
  2. pp. 153-171
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  1. Part II: Authorship, Influence, & Reception: Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Transatlantic Print Culture
  2. p. 173
  1. 10. The Lost Lady in the World of Comus: Catharine Maria Sedgwick and Margaret Fuller Read Milton
  2. pp. 175-187
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  1. 11. Belonging, Longing, and the Exile State in Harriet Beecher Stowe and George Eliot
  2. pp. 188-207
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  1. 12. “In Its English Dress”: Reading Susan Warner’s The Wide, Wide World as a Transatlantic Religious Bestseller
  2. pp. 208-231
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  1. 13. Emily Dickinson and Transatlantic Geology
  2. pp. 232-254
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  1. 14. American Jane Eyres: Louisa May Alcott’s and Anna Katharine Green’s Transatlantic Dialogues with Charlotte Brontë
  2. pp. 255-278
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  1. 15. “The Sympathy of Another Writer”: The Correspondence between Sarah Orne Jewett and Mrs. Humphry Ward
  2. pp. 279-307
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 309-312
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  1. Publication Credits
  2. pp. 313-314
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 315-330
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