Cover, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Illustrations

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p. ix

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

The road that led to the completion of this book meandered from Brockville, Ontario, through Kingston, Ontario, and then on to Columbia, South Carolina, and finally the University of Wyoming, in Laramie. Over the course of these travels...

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Introduction: Civil War Time(s)

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pp. 1-10

Since Robert E. Lee’s 1865 Palm Sunday surrender, the Civil War has marked and defined time in the nineteenth century. Like a clock that strikes only one hour, the Civil War split nineteenth-century American time into two discrete units: antebellum...

Time on the Battlefields

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pp. 11-53

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1. Time Lost, Time Found: The Confederate Victory at Manassas and the Union Defeat at Bull Run

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pp. 13-33

“Watch in hand, they await[ed] the approach of the half hour, and as the last second of the last minute [was] marked on the dial plate,” Captain George S. James “pull[ed] the lanyard; there [was] a flash of light and a ten inch shell trac[ed] its pathway towards...

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2. “An Hour Too Late”: The Confederate Defeat at Gettysburg

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pp. 34-53

By July 1863, public hopes in both the United States and the Confederacy for a short war had dissipated. The mighty offensive victory thought so easily attainable in 1861 remained elusive. With thousands dead, wounded, and imprisoned, public support...

Time Away from the Battlefields

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3. “Like a Wheel in a Watch”: Soldiers, Camp, and Battle Time

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pp. 57-69

Union sergeant Isaac Newton Parker’s June 21, 1863, letter to his wife resonated with anxiety, tension, and a terrible concern. Although not broken, Parker’s watch had not been serviced in seven years. Rather than trust the precious task to unreliable...

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4. Battle Time: Gender, Modernity, and Civil War Hospitals

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pp. 70-88

While men took to the battlefields to ensure their independence, women challenged societal norms and took to the hospitals to care for the wounded. Archetypal womanhood mandated modesty, domesticity, purity, delicacy, gentility...

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5. Doing Time: The Cannon, the Clock, and Civil War Prisons

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pp. 89-109

“Indolence,” Dorothea Dix maintained, “opened the portal . . . to vice and crime” and thus threatened to disrupt the desired industrious nature of antebellum society by undermining order and damaging the country’s republican...

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Epilogue: Antebellum Temporalities in the Postbellum Period

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pp. 111-123

At “half past one on Sunday, the 9th of April 1865,” General Ulysses S. Grant arrived at Wilmer McLean’s Appomattox Court House home to accept Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s surrender.1 The flourish of a quill destroyed...

Notes

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pp. 125-150

Bibliography

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pp. 151-185

Index

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pp. 187-195