Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright Page

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Dedication Page

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Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

In the summer of 1993, on break from architecture school, I paid a visit to friends in the city of Detroit. I knew of Detroit’s fearsome reputation, and the city’s vacant lots, burned-out homes, and bleak, empty skyscrapers confirmed Detroit as the paradigm of urban blight. The sense of emptiness was...

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Chapter 1. ‘‘The Burden Has Passed’’: Urban Design After Urban Renewal

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pp. 1-36

In 1970 (Montgomery 1971, 35) the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD, announced a new program to rebuild urban neighborhoods across the United States. Coming at the end of two decades in which American cities had been reconstructed, reshaped, and rethought as never before in their history, many people must have found it...

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Chapter 2. Shrinkage or Renewal? The Fate of Older Cities, 1950–90

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pp. 37-83

In 1950, few of the many passersby on Detroit’s Woodward Avenue could have predicted the ruinous condition of the street fifty years later. The street’s postwar vibrancy made Woodward’s future demise seem both improbable and impossible. How could Woodward’s passersby have known that Detroit’s central shopping street—the nexus of retailing and office...

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Chapter 3. ‘‘People Want These Houses’’: The Suburbanization of Detroit

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pp. 84-127

On Detroit’s far east side, along the shore of the Detroit River, lies a neighborhood called Jefferson-Chalmers. It is much like other Detroit neighborhoods, including the source of its name, prosaically derived from two neighborhood streets (Figure 3.1). Jefferson-Chalmers’s very long city blocks that are located perpendicular to the river are legacies from French eighteenth-century arpent subdivisions, which permitted landowners...

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Chapter 4. ‘‘Another Tradition in Planning’’: The Suburbanization of North Philadelphia

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pp. 128-173

On January 6, 1992, W. Wilson Goode stepped down as mayor of Philadelphia. Few, Goode not excepted, would argue that his term had been successful. In reality, the past two decades had not been good ones for the city. Polarizing mayor Frank Rizzo and Goode, the city’s first African American mayor, had seen Philadelphia suffer a host of related problems: economic...

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Chapter 5. Toward Social Urbanism for Shrinking Cities

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pp. 174-224

Far away from the shrinking cities of the United States, the rapidly growing city of Medellín, Colombia, experienced a revolution between 2003 and 2010. This was a political revolution, but not the kind that one might expect given Latin America’s twentieth-century history. Medellín’s revolution was one of architecture, political economy, and social justice—in short, a revolution of social urbanism. This was the term coined by Alejandro Echevarri...

Notes

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pp. 225-226

Works Cited

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pp. 227-244

Index

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pp. 245-262

Acknowledgments

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pp. 263-263