Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

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1. Introduction: Making the Nation on the Margins

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pp. 3-31

In his oft-cited work on nationalism, Benedict Anderson writes that “in the modern world everyone can, should, will, ‘have’ a nationality, as he or she ‘has’ a gender” (1983:5). Possessing a national identity can be seen as being as natural as having a gender. Except that, of course, there is nothing “natural” about...

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2. Capturing Indian Bodies, Hearths, and Minds: The Gendered Politics of Rural School Reform in Bolivia, 1920s–1940s

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pp. 32-59

For a good while now, feminist scholars have illuminated the complicated gendered processes that accompanied modern state-building and development policies in twentieth-century Latin America. Just as modernizing a European nation’s devised social...

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3. Making Music Safe for the Nation: Folklore Pioneers in Bolivian Indigenism

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pp. 60-80

In the 1990s, the past became a profitable refuge of Latin American music projects. Buena Vista Social Club brought Cuban octogenarians to international stages, and Carlos Vives’s album Clásicos de la Provincia connected music of “grandfathers” with...

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4. The Choreography of Territory, Agency, and Cultural Survival: The Vicuña Hunting Ritual “Chuqila”

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pp. 81-106

Recent studies on the nation have called attention to the importance of the performative as a way of understanding how national narratives generate meaning and self-legitimation. Drawing from Judith Butler’s work on the performance of gender...

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5. Dancing on the Borderlands: Girls (Re)Fashioning National Belonging in the Andes

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pp. 107-129

Notions of modern citizens and national identities are typically built on unmarked categories of masculinity, “whiteness,” urban residence, and adulthood, yet those others—women, nonwhites, children—are also citizens, both in the formal sense of having...

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6. The Indian Within, the Indian Without: Citizenship, Race, and Sex in a Bolivian Hamlet

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pp. 130-155

On a recent trip to the village of Pocobaya1 in the highlands of Bolivia I found myself sitting in a friend’s kitchen whilst she prepared one of my favorite dishes. As she busied herself preparing the guinea pig and I peeled vegetables, we chatted about...

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7. From Political Prison to Tourist Village: Tourism, Gender, Indigeneity, and the State on Taquile Island, Peru

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pp. 156-180

In 1922, eight years before seizing presidential power in a coup, “The Macho” Luís Miguel Sánchez Cerro was exiled to Lake Titicaca’s remote and frigid Taquile Island, 3,800 meters above sea level, following an unsuccessful armed revolt against the...

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Afterword: Andean Identities: Multiplicities, Socialities, Materialities

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pp. 181-193

This summer in Lima, two different Peruvians gave me some insight into what Andean identity looks like from the perspective of that coastal city. The first was a taxi driver who described himself angrily as “the last Limeño”: a lonely survivor in a city...

Contributors

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pp. 195-196

Index

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pp. 197-201