Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

The publication of C. Vann Woodward’s The Strange Career of Jim Crow in 1955 prompted an extended scholarly debate about the timing and practices of segregation in the years immediately following the Civil War. In fact the discussion was so profound that Woodward himself reentered the fray, with...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-16

Alabama Governor George Wallace’s incendiary inaugural address in 1963 was, in retrospect, one of the death throes of legal segregation in the United States. Wallace failed to preserve segregation in Alabama or anywhere else in “the Great Anglo- Saxon Southland.” But his fervid pledge was a succinct summation of the logic that had sustained segregation for almost a century in the Jim Crow...

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1. Identity, Marriage, and Schools:Life along the Color Line/ s in the Era of Plessy v. Ferguson

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pp. 17-53

In 1877, former “free persons of color” and former slaves alike lived in Virginia as citizens, with voting rights and access to segregated schooling. Rowena McPherson and George Stewart resided in Manchester, across the James River from Richmond, the recent capital of the Confederacy. Though they had married...

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2. Southern Indians and Jim Crow

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pp. 54-90

In 1969, Myron Jones of the National Congress of American Indians went to Marksville, Louisiana, to investigate the situation of the local Tunica- Biloxi Indians. They owned 130 acres on which local whites had encroached by hunting deer, building a road and a gas station, and using the Indians’ cemetery...

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3. The “New Race Question”: The Problem of Poor Whites and the Color Line

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pp. 91-123

In 1905, Albert Bushnell Hart, son of an Ohio abolitionist and professor of history at Harvard University, wrote an article on recent conditions in the New South and noted, “No Northern visitor crosses Mason and Dixon’s line without realizing there is a Southern problem.” Having made several trips to...

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4. “Nature is the Author of Such Restrictions”: Science, Ethnological Medicine, and Jim Crow

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pp. 124-149

When prominent naturalist and retired Army surgeon R. W. Shufeldt published his fi rst book-length examination of America’s “negro problem” in 1907, he did so for the “for the sole purpose of pointing out, from a purely scientific viewpoint, the effect that these introduced Ethiopians have had...

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5. From the “Ladies’ Car” to the “Colored Car”: Black Female Travelers in the Segregated South

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pp. 150-175

The National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs leader Mary Church Terrell “was no more than five years old” when she first had “the Race Problem brought directly home to me.” Born in 1863, Mollie Church, as she then was known, was traveling by train through Tennessee with her father, former...

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6. Is Marriage a Civil Right? The Politics of Intimacy in the Jim Crow Era

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pp. 176-208

Over the past fifteen years the right to marry has moved to the center of discussions about civil rights in contemporary America. The argument over gay marriage rights, for example, is founded in part on the assumption that marriage is both a human and a constitutional right. As historian George Chauncey...

Index

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pp. 209-216

Further Reading, Back Cover

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