Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Conventions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xvi

Ernest Fenollosa’s “Th e Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry,” edited and published by Ezra Pound, is one of the cardinal references in American poetics. Every generation since 1919 has revisited it. But the version of the essay that has circulated for the last ninety years reflects Pound’s understanding of the text. Fenollosa’s manuscripts, preserved with Pound’s editorial markings in the...

read more

Fenollosa Compounded: A Discrimination

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-40

Th e place of Ernest Francisco Fenollosa’s essay “The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry” as a major document of twentieth-century American poetry and poetics is secure—if only that is the right place to put it. Donald Davie considered it “perhaps the only English document of our time fit to rank...

read more

Th e Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry: An Ars Poetica

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-60

Th is twentieth century not only turns a new page in the book of the world, but opens another and a startling chapter. Vistas of strange futures unfold for man, of world-embracing cultures half weaned from Europe, of hitherto undreamed responsibilities for nations and races...

Appendix: With Some Notes by A Very Ignorant Man

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-74

read more

Th e Chinese Written Language as a Medium for Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-104

Th is Twentieth Century not only turns a new page in the Book of the World, but opens another and a startling Chapter. Vistas of strange futures unfold for man, of world-embracing cultures half-weaned from Europe, of hitherto undreamed responsibilities for nations and races...

read more

Synopsis of Lectures on Chinese and Japanese Poetry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-125

As East and West permanently come together, their literature, as well as their arts, will demand a comparative study. It would be Chinese narrowness in us to assume that the only literature or the only laws of literature are ours, which Europe has built up from Homer to Kipling. Already we have to admit Sanskrit language and Buddhist thought to the ranks of literature. But Sanskrit and Pali...

read more

Chinese and Japanese Poetry. Draft of Lecture I. Vol. II.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-143

Th is process of devitalizing language1 we have already seen to be only partially accomplished in the case of Chinese. Practically all words are verbs, and all retain some transitive meaning, and we saw the little parasites of prepositions, adjectives, intransitives & passives, even negatives, only beginning to grow up. It is we...

read more

Chinese and Japanese Traits

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 144-152

have repeatedly heard it said, and seen it written, that the Chinese race and civilization, compared with the Japanese, are of a decidedly inferior type. Unprogressive China is supposed to be ugly, prosaic, and degraded; mechanical in temperament, sordid and practical in aim. Th e art of Japan, especially, is thought...

read more

The Coming Fusion of East and West

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-165

The character and meaning of the far, alien world we call the East have merely pricked the curiosity of stray scholars, or spurred the ambition of a few adventurous merchants. Most of us read of British diplomacy at Peking with a vague curiosity, as an echo from another planet rather than as the crisis of modern...

read more

Chinese Ideals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 166-173

Considering its enormous size, its great age, and its importance to the world, it seems strange that Western knowledge of China should have been, from earlier days, a matter of extremely slow growth.
To the ancient Greeks and Romans, China was hardly more than a remote...

read more

[Retrospect on the Fenollosa Papers]

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-176

Aft er meeting Mrs Fenollosa1 at Sarojini Naidu’s2 in in or about 19 she read some of my verse and decided that I was “the only person who could deal with her late husband’s note books as he would wished.” I was then totally ignorant of ideogram but published three attempts to follow her wishes, the contents of...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-208

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-216