Title, Copyright

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Contents

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Foreword

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pp. vii-x

In my role as an editor, I always find my reading through of the draft articles of a new Annual Review a rather intense experience. As the one responsible for the final form of the Annual, I read each and every article, at one time or another, at least a half-dozen times; so I flatter myself that no one considers every...

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Introduction: Beyond Alliances

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pp. xi-xviii

I want to thank my colleague Bruce Zuckerman, Myron and Marian Casden Director of the Casden Institute for the Study of the Jewish Role in American Life at the University of Southern California, for the opportunity to work on this volume of the Casden Annual Review. Although this was a project that...

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Unexpected Allies

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pp. 1-32

In 1944, Soledad Vidaurri went to the 17th Street Elementary School in Orange County, California to enroll her children and their cousins, Ithe Méndezes, for the upcoming school year.1 While the administration accepted her two children into the so-called “American School,” they...

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Multicultural Music, Jews, and American Culture

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pp. 33-69

This essay traces the personal and professional story of William “Bill” Phillips, contextualized within the multiracial history of Los Angeles, and the larger discourse surrounding multiculturalism, whiteness, assimilation, and what historian...

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Rosalind Wiener Wyman and the Transformation of Jewish Liberalism in Cold War Los Angeles

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pp. 71-110

The end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War represented a transformative period for Jewish politics in Los Angeles. Jews, as a religious minority subject to discrimination, were an integral part of leftist and liberal interracial organizing from the 1930s through the 1940s. As...

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Fighting Many Battles

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pp. 111-142

Los Angeles-based Jewish labor organizer and civil rights activist, Max Mont, developed a commitment to social justice at an early age. “When I was six years old,” Mont recalled in 1987, “I was trying to make speeches in our living room about the ‘oppressed people’” (“Max Mont, ‘Labor...

About the Contributors

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pp. 143-144

The USC Casden Institute for the Study of the Jewish Role in American Life

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pp. 145-146