Cover

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Title PAge, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

My seven-year-old daughter recently declared, though I need no reminding, that “an important history” is represented in this book. She’s right, of course. And I’m mindful that it marks, inevitably, only a partial sense of the astonishing work these women undertook, just as I’m mindful that there were so many more women laboring for black feminist causes ...

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Introduction: Going Public: African American Feminismin the Era of Reform

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pp. xiii-xxxvi

On October 1, 1858, William Hayward wrote William Lloyd Garrison at The Liberator from Silver Lake, Indiana, to tell of Sojourner Truth’s handling of a rather outrageous challenge at one of her antislavery meetings in the north of that state. An activist for abolition, woman’s rights, universal suffrage, and the rights of freed and working-class African Americans, ...

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Chapter 1: Soul Winners and Sanctified Sisters: Nineteenth-Century African American Preaching Women

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pp. 1-48

Despite institutional sanctions against their licensing or ordination, African American women were active in the nineteenth century as preachers, exhorters, evangelists, and missionaries. From Rebecca Cox Jackson’s Shaker mission among African Americans in Philadelphia to the itinerant preaching of women such as Jarena Lee and Sojourner Truth ...

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Chapter 2: Internationalizing Black Feminisms: Ellen Craft, Sarah Parker Remond, and American Slavery in the British Isles and Ireland

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pp. 49-92

The work African American preaching women undertook to politicize soul winning, particularly their attention to the elision of material realities in the abstraction of the spirit or soul, is linked to the abolitionist work of black women at midcentury. Black female abolitionists, whether working in the United States or within the transatlantic network, ...

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Chapter 3: “I don’t know how you will feel when I get through”: Racial Difference, Symbolic Value, and Sojourner Truth

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pp. 93-130

At the 1867 convention of the American Equal Rights Association (AERA), Sojourner Truth readied her audience to hear her speak on a subject she believed they had begun to ignore—the rights and material conditions of formerly enslaved African Americans, including “the colored woman.” ...

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Chapter 4: The Platform, the Pamphlet, and the Press: Ida B. Wells’s Pedagogy of American Lynching

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pp. 131-166

From a consideration of black feminist labors within woman’s rights reform circles through a particular focus on Sojourner Truth, I wish now to turn again to black feminism as it takes the international stage and thereby keep firmly in sight the way in which early black feminism reached beyond “local” concerns, rhetorics, and politics. ...

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Chapter 5: “We must be up and doing” : Feminist Black Nationalism in the Press

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pp. 167-224

“Even though we wish to shun them, and hold ourselves entirely aloof from them, we cannot escape the consequences of their acts. So, that, . . policy and self-preservation would demand that we do go among the lowly, the illiterate, and even the vicious to whom we are bound by the ties of race and sex, ...

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Conclusion: Feminist Affiliations in a Divisive Climate: Anna Julia Cooper’s “Woman versus the Indian”

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pp. 225-248

“It is not the intelligent woman vs. the ignorant woman; nor the white woman vs. the black, the brown, and the red,—it is not even the cause of woman vs. man. Nay, ’tis woman’s strongest vindication for speaking that the world needs to hear her voice. . . . Hers is every interest that has lacked an interpreter and a defender. ...

Notes

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pp. 249-294

Works Cited

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pp. 295-318

Index

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pp. 319-340