In this Book

Answering Auschwitz
summary
More than twenty years ago, the Italian chemist, writer and Holocaust survivor Primo Levi fell to his death from the stairwell of his apartment building in Turin. Within hours, a debate exploded as to whether his death was an accident or a suicide and, if the latter, how this might force us to reinterpret his legacy as a writer and survivor.Many weighed in with thoughtful and sometimes provocative commentary, but the debate over his death has sometimes overshadowed the larger significance of his place as a thinker after Auschwitz.This volume contains essays that deal directly with Levi and his work; others tangentially use Levi's writings or ideas to explore larger issues in Holocaust studies, philosophy, theology, and the problem of representation. They are included here in the spirit that Levi described himself: proud of being impureand a centaur,cognizant that asymmetry is the fundamental structure of organic life. I became a Jew in Auschwitz,Levi once wrote, comparing the concentration camp to a universityof life. Yet he could also paradoxically admit, in an interview late in life, There is Auschwitz, and so there cannot be God.Rather than seek to untangle these contradictions, Levi embraced them. This volume seeks to embrace them as well.

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright,
  2. pp. i-iv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Prologue: Answering Auschwitz: Levi’s Science and Humanism as Antifascism
  2. pp. 1-14
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part One: Psychology, Theology, and Philosophy
  2. pp. 15-16
  1. Chapter 1: ‘‘Warum?’’
  2. pp. 17-30
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 2: Guilt or Shame?
  2. pp. 31-40
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 3: Primo Levi and the Concept of History
  2. pp. 41-55
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 4: Kenosis, Saturated Phenomenology, and Bearing Witness
  2. pp. 56-66
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 5: After Auschwitz: What Is a Good Death?
  2. pp. 67-84
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part Two: Humanism and Politics
  2. pp. 85-86
  1. Chapter 6: The Humanity and Humanism of Primo Levi
  2. pp. 87-102
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 7: Levi and the Two Cultures
  2. pp. 103-113
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 8: The Partisan and His Doppelganger: The Case of Primo Levi
  2. pp. 114-126
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 9: Primo Levi in the Public Interest: Turin, Auschwitz, Israel
  2. pp. 127-134
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part Three: Literature
  2. pp. 135-136
  1. Chapter 10: Primo Levi’s Struggle with the Spirit of Kafka
  2. pp. 137-146
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 11: Ethics and Literary Strategies
  2. pp. 147-155
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 12: Literary Encounters and Storytelling Techniques
  2. pp. 156-168
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 13: Primo Levi and the History of Reception
  2. pp. 169-176
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 14: Autobiography and the Narrator
  2. pp. 177-190
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part Four: Reflections on Writing
  2. pp. 191-192
  1. Chapter 15: Writing Against the Fascist Sword
  2. pp. 193-199
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 16: ‘‘Singoli Stimoli’’: Primo Levi’s Poetry
  2. pp. 200-211
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 17: Primo Levi’s Correspondence with Hety Schmitt-Maas
  2. pp. 212-216
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 18: A Note on the Problem of Translation
  2. pp. 217-219
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 19: Primo Levi: A Bibliography of English and Italian Scholarly Writings, 2003–2010
  2. pp. 220-240
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Epilogue: Primo Levi’s Gray Zone: A Sequence of Drawings
  2. pp. 241-246
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 247-282
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 283-294
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 295-300
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 301-316
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.