In this Book

summary

Exploring the Yoruba tradition in the United States, Hucks begins with the story of Nana Oseijeman Adefunmi’s personal search for identity and meaning as a young man in Detroit in the 1930s and 1940s. She traces his development as an artist, religious leader, and founder of several African-influenced religio-cultural projects in Harlem and later in the South. Adefunmi was part of a generation of young migrants attracted to the bohemian lifestyle of New York City and the black nationalist fervor of Harlem. Cofounding Shango Temple in 1959, Yoruba Temple in 1960, and Oyotunji African Village in 1970, Adefunmi and other African Americans in that period renamed themselves “Yorubas” and engaged in the task of transforming Cuban Santería into a new religious expression that satisfied their racial and nationalist leanings and eventually helped to place African Americans on a global religious schema alongside other Yoruba practitioners in Africa and the diaspora.

Alongside the story of Adefunmi, Hucks weaves historical and sociological analyses of the relationship between black cultural nationalism and reinterpretations of the meaning of Africa from within the African American community.

Table of Contents

  1. Front Cover
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  1. Title Page
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  1. Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Illustrations
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. xiii-xvi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xvii-xxviii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xxix-xxxiv
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  1. The Harlem Window: An Introduction
  2. pp. 1-20
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  1. PART ONE: The Harlem Years
  2. pp. 21-22
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  1. 1: “We Have as Much Right . . . to Believe that God Is a Negro”: Religious Nationalism and the Rehumanization of Blackness
  2. pp. 23-49
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  1. 2: “Here I Is Where I Has Longed to Be”: Racial Agency, Urban Religion, and the Early Years of Walter Eugene King
  2. pp. 50-87
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  1. 3: Harlem Yoruba, Orisha-Vodu, and the Making of “New Oyo”
  2. pp. 88-120
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  1. 4: “Indigenous Literacies” and the African Library Series: A Textual Approach to History, Nation, and Tradition
  2. pp. 121-141
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  1. 5: “This Religion Comes from Cuba!”: Race, Religion, and Contested Geographies
  2. pp. 142-164
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  1. PART TWO: African American Yoruba Since 1970
  2. pp. 165-166
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  1. 6: Oyotunji African Village: A Diaspora Experiment in African Nationhood
  2. pp. 167-225
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  1. 7: “That’s Alright . . . I’m a Yoruba Baptist”: Negotiating Religious Plurality and “Theological Openness” in African American Yoruba Practice
  2. pp. 226-270
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  1. 8: “Afrikan Americans in the U.S.A. Bring Something Different to Ifa”: Indigenizing Yoruba Religious Cultures
  2. pp. 271-310
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  1. Conclusion: “What We’re Looking for in Africa Is Already Here”: A Conclusion for the Twenty-first Century
  2. pp. 311-342
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 343-406
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 407-429
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 430-438
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  1. Back Cover
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780826350770
Print ISBN
9780826350756
MARC Record
OCLC
792944585
Pages
456
Launched on MUSE
2012-06-26
Language
English
Open Access
N
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