Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-xi

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Acknowledgments

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p. xiii

We would like to thank Tom Rocek, organizer of the seventy- first Annual Meeting of the society for American Archaeology held in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2006, for inviting L. Antonio Curet to organize the opening session of the meetings that led to the formation...

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Introduction: Migration, Seafaring, and Cultural Contact in the Caribbean

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pp. 1-10

By the mere definition of human society and culture, interaction is the basis of most, if not all, human behavior. Just a quick overview of the different social sciences reflects the preeminent position of interaction. Sociology focuses on intragroup relations, political science...

I. Peoples and Boundaries: Systematics and the Practice of Caribbean Archaeology

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pp. 11-56

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1. Irving Rouse's Contribution to American Archaeology: The Case of Migration

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pp. 13-21

When discussing the study of long- distance interaction in the Caribbean, one cannot ignore the contributions of Irving Rouse. While he was not the first scholar to suggest the close relationship between the islands, South America, and even Central America, he, in collaboration with local archaeologists...

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2. The Ghost of Caliban: Island Archaeology, Insular Archaeologists, and the Caribbean

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pp. 22-40

In geographical terms, islands seem obvious: land entirely surrounded by water. Their characterization, however, is extremely complex. They are “schizophrenic,” hybrid by practice. They are not dry land and are not sea. They are connected but isolated. They are accessible but remote...

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3. Colonies without Frontiers: Inter-island Trade in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Caribbean

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pp. 41-56

By 1713, the Treaty of Utrecht had ended the War of Spanish succession and had, in theory, formalized the imperial domains of northern European powers in the Americas, particularly in the Caribbean. Simultaneously, a series of legislative actions taken by the imperial seats attempted...

II. Tracing Exchange: Intensities and Scales of Interaction

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pp. 57-134

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4. Patterns of Contact between the Islands of the Caribbean and the Surrounding Mainland as a Navigation Problem

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pp. 59-72

Contacts between the Caribbean islands and the northeastern South American mainland during the Ceramic Period (ca. 300 b.C. to a.d. 1500) are widely accepted by archaeologists working in the region. This is not surprising given the supposed northeastern...

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5. Ties with the Homelands: Archipelagic Interaction and the Enduring Role of the South and Central American Mainlands in the Pre-Columbian Lesser Antilles

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pp. 73-86

The pre-Columbian communities of the Lesser Antilles were anything but insular. The discontinuous distribution of natural resources, the maritime orientation of the Amerindian settlers, and the complexities of the region-wide social interaction patterns ensured...

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6. Contraband in the Convento? : Material Indications of Trade Relations in the Spanish Colonies

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pp. 87-103

Contraband and contraband goods in the Spanish colonies raise questions of social and economic change. The monopolistic restrictions that the Spanish monarchy placed on trade with the colonies, the restrictions that the Spanish administration enacted to thwart...

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7. Good as Gold: The Aesthetic Brilliance of the Lucayans

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pp. 104-134

The Antillean world prior to A. D. 1492 consisted of overlapping webs of interaction where ideas, cultural practices, and biology met and intersected. as this volume demonstrates, exploration, migration, colonization, feuding, raiding, visiting, exchange, gift-giving...

III. Redefining Boundaries through Social Interaction

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8. The Magens House, Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, Danish West Indies: Archaeology of an Urban House Compound and Its Relationship to Local Interactions and Global Trade

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pp. 137-163

This essay examines the archaeological and historical context of the Magens House, an urban merchant’s household, house compound, urban gardens, and farm located on Government Hill in the Kongens (Kings) Quarter of Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas (figures 8.1–8.4). We make...

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9. Close Encounters of the Caribbean Kind

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pp. 164-192

Archaeologically, the Antillean chain has long been regarded as a marginal space in the areas bathed by the Caribbean Sea. Even though macro- regional interactions between continental regions facing the Caribbean have been explored in detail, with very few exceptions...

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10. Competitive Polities and Territorial Expansion in the Caribbean

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pp. 193-218

In the early morning hours of Friday, October 12, 1492, a contingent of men under the command of Christopher Columbus arrived at one of the islands in the Bahamas. A couple of months later they arrived at Hispaniola. in the next several years most of the...

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11. Islands at the Crossroads: Archaeology of Interaction in the Caribbean

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pp. 219-232

Essays in this volume tackle the question of interaction, albeit from remarkably different time periods (colonial vs. pre-Columbian) on sites that encompass a range of activities: the working of shell in the age of the industrial revolution to the intercontinental transshipment of goods during...

References

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pp. 233-301

List of Contributors

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pp. 303-306

Index

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pp. 307-314

Back Cover

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