Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

Figure List

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pp. ix-xi

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Foreword

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pp. xiii-xvi

In all fields of scholarship, certain issues become prisms of theoretical and interpretive positions. In the small subfield of Mesoamerican archaeology, one of the most divisive issues (in a literal, ‘‘prismatic’’ sense) has been the debate over the role of external...

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Chapter 1: Introduction: Reinterpreting Early Classic Interaction

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pp. 1-43

Since the remarkable discovery in 1936 of foreign ceramics and talud-tablero architecture (platforms with façades consisting of inwardsloping basal elements stacked with rectangular bodies containing recessed insets) at Kaminaljuyu...

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Chapter 2: Teotihuacan, Militarism, and Pacific Guatemala

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pp. 45-79

The nature of interaction between Teotihuacan and distant regions has been ambiguous, and an understanding of its essential characteristics is important for several reasons. First, from the perspective of regions such as Pacific...

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Chapter 3: Dating Early Classic Interaction between Kaminaljuyu and Central Mexico

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pp. 81-104

In 1925, the polymath Walter Lehmann identified centralMexican ceramics in private collections from Kaminaljuyu (Bove 2000). But the presence of Teotihuacan-style pottery at the site remained generally unknown until 1936, when Alfred V. Kidder...

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Chapter 4: Understanding Early Classic Interaction between Kaminaljuyu and Central Mexico

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pp. 105-142

Numerous explications have been proposed for the appearance of central Mexican ceramics and obsidian, as well as for locally manufactured architecture in a foreign style, at Kaminaljuyu. Nearly all published scenarios, including that put forward...

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Chapter 5: Founding Events and Teotihuacan Connections at Copán, Honduras

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pp. 143-165

The archaeological site of Copán is situated in a fertile upland valley in western Honduras. Copán has long been recognized as an important political and religious center that was settled during the late Early Preclassic (c. 1000 B. C. ; Fash 1991), but reached...

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Chapter 6: Problematical Deposits and the Problem of Interaction: The Material Culture of Tikal during the Early Classic Period

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pp. 167-198

Twenty years have passed since the Dumbarton Oaks conference that resulted in the volume Highland-Lowland Interaction in Mesoamerica: Interdisciplinary Approaches (Miller 1983).The contributors to that work formulated the basis of what continues to be the majority...

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Chapter 7: Architectural Aspects of Interaction between Tikal and Teotihuacan during the Early Classic Period

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pp. 199-216

The development and nature of interaction between Tikal and Teotihuacan are controversial subjects. Many perspectives have emerged in the attempt to understand the relationship between these two Early Classic Mesoamerican cities...

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Chapter 8: Images of Power and the Power of Images: Early Classic Iconographic Programs of the Carved Monuments of Tikal

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pp. 217-234

At the dawn of the Early Classic period, inhabitants of the Maya lowlands began to carve and erect stelae.1 For some of these sites, the appearance of carved monuments corresponded with the establishment of dynastic rule, a new political order that required innovative forms of public...

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Chapter 9: Teotihuacan at Altun Ha: Did It Make a Difference?

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pp. 235-247

For a number of Mesoamericanists, including some Mayanists, the core-periphery view of the ancient world offers notable attractions. In such reconstructions of the past, it is necessary only that one identify the central, productive core in order to commence...

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Chapter 10: Teotihuacan and Oxkintok: New Perspectives from Yucatán

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pp. 249-271

Since the early twentieth century, questions of interaction and the spread of Teotihuacan-related features in the Maya area have generated many studies that use a variety of methodologies and adopt very different points of view...

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Chapter 11: Tetitla and the Maya Presence at Teotihuacan

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pp. 273-314

The great metropolis of Teotihuacan by no means stood alone in aloof isolation. Rather, it participated in direct and sustained contact with many regions of Early Classic Mesoamerica. Other chapters in this volume focus on Teotihuacan...

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Chapter 12: Teotihuacan and Early Classic Interaction: A Perspective from Outside the Maya Region

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pp. 315-335

Relations between Teotihuacan and societies in the Maya area have long been a controversial topic. The effect of this book is less to resolve disputes than to assemble recent information and to frame the issues more clearly...

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Chapter 13: The Maya and Teotihuacan

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pp. 337-356

Thanks to all the new data being gathered in Mesoamerica, we are now in a better position to develop models for the interaction between Teotihuacan and the Maya. In preparing this chapter, I reviewed the evidence for ‘‘foreign ties’’ at each of the seven...

Bibliography

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pp. 357-405

Index

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pp. 407-423