Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

It was 1988 when I first visited South Africa to volunteer for a year at a township school in Mthatha called Ikhwezi Lokusa. Six years later South Africans freed themselves from apartheid, and in that year, 1994, I returned amid the celebrations. Virtually every year since then I have...

A Note on Racial Terms

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xiii

List of Acronyms

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. xv

read more

1. Gender and AIDS in an Unequal World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-18

In 2006, Jacob Zuma, then sixty-four and South Africa’s former deputy president, was accused of rape. Zuma, who had entered anti-apartheid politics after growing up in rural KwaZulu-Natal, faced charges from a woman he had known for some time—her father was a fellow member of the African National Congress before his death. “Khwezi” (Star), as she...

read more

2. Mandeni: “The AIDS Capital of KwaZulu-Natal”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-32

If you drive north from Durban up the N2 highway you might smell central Mandeni before you see it. You know you are getting close when you cross the Thukela River, which formerly divided the British colony of Natal from the independent Zulu Kingdom. Then, turning onto a northwest-bound road, you will pass the former white...

Part 1: Revisiting Intimacy and Apartheid

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 33

read more

3. Providing Love: Male Migration and Building a Rural Home

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-59

The inkosi’s (chief ’s) court was a strange place to talk about sex. Seated on rows of benches that scraped noisily on the concrete floor, attendees were mostly senior men, a fact that reinforced the court’s masculine aura. Trying my best to act deferentially by avoiding eye contact, I stole glances at the inkosi and observed his graying stubble and medium build. The court secretary ushered me forward when it was my turn to talk. The...

read more

4. Urban Respectability: Sundumbili Township, 1964–94

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 60-83

Mr. Nkosi’s home, completed in 1964, is small and rectangular in shape, one of the thousands of “matchbox houses” built in South Africa’s townships during the apartheid era. Its main entrance opens directly into a small lounge, off which open a kitchen, two small bedrooms, and a tiny bathroom. Paint now peels from the house’s inside walls and the absence of ceiling boards ...

read more

5. Shacks in the Cracks of Apartheid

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 84-102

It is an unusually wet fall even for the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal. The year is 2000 and I am moving into Isithebe’s informal/jondolo settlement from the nearby farm where I have been staying for a few weeks. The contrast couldn’t be more striking. At the farm, the rain nourishes the neatly ordered sugar cane fields that stretch comfortably across the hills above...

Part 2 Intimacy after Democracy, 1994–

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 103

read more

6. Postcolonial Geographies: Being “Left Behind” in the New South Africa

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-129

In the last chapter we met Dudu, an “industrial woman” who found employment as a garment worker in Isithebe’s factories in the 1970s. With a regular income, however small, women like Dudu often shunned marriage to men—who, in turn, had become progressively less able to afford it. Yet in the 1990s, despite the joy of being able to vote for the first time in her life, Dudu faced declining personal, economic...

read more

7. Independent Women: Rights amid Wrongs, and Men’s Broken Promises

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 130-154

In 2000, the U.S.-based band Destiny’s Child released the song “Independent Women.” The R’n’B track quickly became a hit in South Africa: the music of the African-American female band seemed to especially resonate with African women to whom democracy had brought new rights. The song demanded confidently, “All the women who are independent, throw your hands up at me...

read more

8. Failing Men: Modern Masculinities amid Unemployment

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-177

In November 2004, I started my rusty Mazda and drove toward MaDoris’s tavern in Sundumbili township. The warm sun had yet to set; it was still early to go out. Residents sauntered along the narrow pavements, lost in conversation; streets serve as an indispensable point of social interaction in overcrowded townships. I collected three young male friends, all in their early twenties, at a crossroads where they washed and vacuumed...

read more

9. All You Need Is Love? The Materiality of Everyday Sex and Love

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 178-201

When I began living in Mandeni in 2000 I was struck by an apparent paradox: everybody I knew discussed the close connection between money and sex, and yet they said that few “prostitutes” lived in the area. In my attempt to explore the materiality of everyday sex, I talked to factory managers and unions about job losses and declining wages. I looked at how rents had increased relative to ...

Part 3: Interventions

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 203

read more

10. The Politics of Gender, Intimacy, and AIDS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-225

“It is important that we all should recognize the fact that it was very deliberate that we chose this community of Mandeni,” Jacob Zuma told a Mandeni crowd in July 2001. “We do so to highlight our serious concern about the scale and ferocity that HIV/AIDS is engulfing our rural communities and youth in those communities.”1 Zuma, then the country’s deputy president, was speaking at the opening of Mandeni’s loveLife youth...

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-230

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-266

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 267-292

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-303