Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

I owe thanks, first of all, to the Center for American Progress for offering me a fellowship in 2006 that enabled me to begin the necessary research for this project. Special appreciation goes to Jonathan Moreno and Sam Berger for their generous support. I am ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

I wish I could remember her exact words. “Don’t cry honey,” urged one of my grandmother’s regular evening caregivers when I came back to her room from the hospital. “It will keep her spirit from passin’ ” . . . or something close to that. Later that day, the night aide who had called at 4 a.m. to tell me they had taken her to the ...

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1 The Plight of the Dependent Elderly and Their Families

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pp. 13-26

The past several decades have seen significant improvement in the health of older adults. In the United States and many other parts of the world, people are living longer and with less chronic disability than ever before (WHO 2003; Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics 2006). The aging population is burgeoning....

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2 The Plight of Paid Workers in Long-term Care

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pp. 27-48

The 500,000 registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) now working in long-term care in the United States provide direct care as well as care coordination and supervision in high and mid-level management positions (Reinhard and Young 2009). Direct care workers, however, play the most integral ...

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3 Tracing Injustice in Long-term Care

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pp. 49-69

Explored from an ecological perspective, long-term care comes into view as a landscape made up of a set of interrelated, interdependent populations and habitats, all suffering under varying degrees of stress and strain, and some facing threats to survival. In this chapter I situate long-term care work in a global context and suggest that an ecological orientation helps to make clear the ways...

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4 An Ecological Ethic

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pp. 70-86

Ecological thinking allows us to trace the structures and processes that organize long-term care labor and connect people around the world: the elderly and their loved ones (mostly daughters) in the North; the poor women, increasingly from the South, who support them; and people needing care in source countries. By ...

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5 Realizing Justice Globally in Long-term Care

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pp. 87-106

How can we move forward, having shifted the lens so that the focus is a bit less on individual agents and a bit more on their interdependence with others and need for certain kinds of habitats, places in which they can become and endure under conditions of equality? Who are the responsible agents and what are they to do? ...

Notes

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pp. 107-112

References

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pp. 113-146

Index

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pp. 147-154