Cover

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Title Page, Map, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Acronyms and Abbreviations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface: Indigenous Organizing and the EZLN in the Context of Neoliberalism in Mexico

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pp. xi-xix

The public appearance of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) in 1994 served as a catalyst in the organization of indigenous women in Mexico. Zapatista women became important advocates of indigenous women’s rights through...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxi-xxiv

First and foremost, I am grateful to the women of Nicolás Ruiz who generously shared their experiences with me and whose strength and commitment remain an inspiration. To protect their identities, I will not mention them by name...

Section One: Key Women's Documents

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pp. 1-54

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Women's Revolutionary Law

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pp. 3-4

In the just fight for the liberation of our people, the EZLN incorporates women into the revolutionary struggle, regardless of their race, creed, color or political affiliation, requiring only that they share the demands of the exploited people...

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Women's Rights in Our Traditions and Customs

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pp. 5-14

We indigenous women have begun to reflect on our rights and the rights of our people. That was the purpose of the workshop “Women’s Rights in Our Traditions and Customs.” About fifty women from the Tzotzil, Tzeltal, Tojola’bal and Mam...

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Comandanta Esthér: Speech before the Mexican Congress

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pp. 15-27

On March 28, 2001, after a mobilization involving thousands, four members of the Zapatista Comandancia spoke to the Mexican Congress to ask them to pass a law (called the Cocopa Law) recognizing indigenous rights...

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International Day of the Rebel Woman

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pp. 28-32

Today, March 8, 2001, the international day of rebel women, Zapatista women, through three of their Comandantas who are members of the Clandestine Revolutionary Indigenous Committee—and who are all part of the Zapatista National Liberation Army delegation that is...

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Introduction

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pp. 33-54

The emergence of indigenous women as new social actors is the expression of a long process of organizing and reflection involving Zapatista and non-Zapatista women that is analyzed by the contributors to this volume...

Section Two: Indigenous Women's Organizing in Chiapas and Mexico: Historical Trajectories, Border Crossings

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pp. 55-154

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Chapter 1: Between Feminist Ethnocentricity and Ethnic Essentialism: The Zapatistas' Demands and the National Indigenous Women's Movement

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pp. 57-74

Kate Rushin’s poem refers to the frustrations and difficulties of many black feminists during the 1970s in the United States. It tells of being a “bridge” between several struggles, of having to “explain” to the black movement the importance...

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Chapter 2: Indigenous Women and Zapatismo: New Horizons of Visibility

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pp. 75-96

Women have become visible in contemporary Zapatismo in various ways, a fact that this movement has had to grapple with. Subcomandante Marcos is not making light of the issue when he states that women belong in Zapatismo...

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Chapter 3: Gender and Stereotypes in the Social Movements of Chiapas [Contains Image Plates]

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pp. 97-114

Recent social movement history in Chiapas begins with the 1970s and 1980s. The peasant movement dominated the Chiapanecan political landscape of that time, and agrarian struggles became the centerpiece of social programs...

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Chapter 4: Weaving in the Spaces: Indigenous Women's Organizing and the Politics of Scale in Mexico

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pp. 115-154

This chapter widens the lens of gender and cultural politics in Chiapas by tracing how the presence of women in the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) has had an impact on local community organizations, reshaped indigenous women’s politics throughout...

Section Three: Rights and Gender in Ethnographic Context

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Chapter 5. Indigenous Women's Activism in Oaxaca and Chiapas

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pp. 157-175

When Zapatista Comandanta Esther addressed the Mexican Congress in March 2001 in a special session on indigenous rights, a key symbolic boundary had been crossed. In Teotitlán del Valle, Oaxaca, Aurora Bazán López was keeping...

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Chapter 6. Autonomy and a Handful of Herbs: Contesting Gender and Ethnic Identities through Healing

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pp. 176-202

The struggle of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) has been notable for the large number of indigenous women in leadership roles and its continued discursive commitment to gender equity. Although there has been considerable...

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Chapter 7: Rights at the Intersection: Gender and Ethnicity in Neoliberal Mexico

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pp. 203-221

The women were gathered in the dark front room of a house in the community of Nicolás Ruiz, Chiapas.1 They had gathered to discuss with me their experience with social movement participation, as base supporters or...

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Chapter 8: "We Can No Longer Be Like Hens with Our Heads Bowed, We Must Raise Our Heads and Look Ahead": A Consideration of the Daily Life of Zapatista Women

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pp. 222-237

More than ten years have passed since the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) came into public view. One of the aspects that has most captured public attention since the beginning is the presence of women in the...

References

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pp. 239-261

Index

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pp. 263-280