In this Book

Talking Shop
summary
In the first book to consider the literary representation of craft, Peter Betjemann asks how artisans, writers, and consumers in an era from 1840 - 1920 tapped into the mainstream popularity of craftsmen in textual terms (philosophical treatises, fiction, catalogues). He argues that the blurred boundaries between craft's production and consumption inform the "artisanal" as a recognizable style and popular lexicon today, describing everything from bread and cappucino to mass-market furnishings.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Contents
  2. p. v
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. p. vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-ix
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-30
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  1. 1. The Ghost Writer: The Canonization of Benvenuto Cellini
  2. pp. 31-70
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  1. 2. Legends of Labor: Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Voice of Craft
  2. pp. 71-104
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  1. 3. The Nature of Gothic: Artisanship, Intuition, and the Representation of Expertise
  2. pp. 105-141
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  1. 4. In the American Grain: Gustav Stickley and the Artisanal Type
  2. pp. 142-193
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  1. 5. The Syntax of the Eye: Author, Artisan, and the ''More Laboring Ages'' in Henry James's The Spoils of Poynton
  2. pp. 194-218
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 219-233
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 235-247
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 249-258
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 259-267
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