Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-ix

Part One

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1. Manifesting Literary Feminism

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pp. 3-31

There are no genderless subjects in any relationship structuring literary culture: not in production, dissemination, or reception; not in objects, discourses, or practices; not in reading experiences or in interpretations. This book—analytic, invested, affectual—discusses masculinity and maleness in poetry as marked and constructed social subject positions framed within a cultural poetics of gender. It investigates male...

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2. Pound Edits Loy and Eliot

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pp. 32-58

In the teens and twenties, male and female cultural workers were struggling with, against, and for female coequality and with resistance to homosexuality in cultural life (Miller 2007, 76).1 Among the acts of affirmation and contestation are warding-off charms (including misogynist bluster), particularly given the fear, in T. S. Eliot’s words in 1917, that writing poetry (by definition feminine or perverse...

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3. Succession and Supersession, from Z to “A”

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pp. 59-85

Certain cautions apply to literary-critical uses of letters, including the sets of letters crucial to this book. The letters in any selected edition appear by an editor’s best judgment at the time; in addition, untold texts may be lost.1 Letters are an emotionally invested practice in which contestation, raillery, intimacy, revelation, and exposure are staged...

Part Two

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4. Poetic Projects of Countercultural Manhood

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pp. 89-116

The works of Beat and “New American” poets of the 1950s in the Pound tradition were overtly countercultural and countercanonical. The poets stood on the periphery of American culture in chosen and flaunted marginality at the moment of the fixing of the Cold War and United States post–World War II hegemony. The most dramatic instance of cultural marginality was Charles Olson; he renounced...

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5. Sex/Gender Contradictions in Olson and Boldereff

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pp. 117-141

Consolidating, analyzing, and deploying maleness in writing are self-conscious, visceral activities for Charles Olson, a “gender project” central to his poetic career (Connell 2005, 72; see also Mossin 2007). Olson’s self creation from about 1949 to 1956 (focusing here on 1949– 1952) produced a mythically invested protean masculinity, to become influential within the ideologies, affiliations, and practices of contemporary...

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6. Olson’s “Long Exaggeration of Males”

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pp. 142-168

The “long exaggeration of males” that Olson acknowledges to his estranged partner Constance Wilcock in 1952 (Olson 2000, 176) is a historical as well as a personal artifact.1 “Manliness and hypermasculinity,” Suzanne Clark proposes, were ideological formations in the American Cold War era. Yet while manhood “was everywhere invoked and women were largely silenced,” there was a general disinclination to credit this as...

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7. Wieners and Creeley after Olson

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pp. 169-197

In 1972 the poet John Wieners published his contribution to “A Curriculum of the Soul,” an Olson-inspired project continued by Jack Clarke, Albert Glover, and George Butterick after Olson’s death in 1970 and centered on key Olson topics.1 The Wieners pamphlet is called WOMAN; later it was called “Women.”2 The differences between a title in the singular (including capitalization) and a title in...

Notes

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pp. 199-223

Bibliography

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pp. 225-243

Index

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pp. 245-250

Further Reading

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