Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Figures

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p. ix

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xi-xii

This book could not have come into being without support from many dedicated people. My greatest appreciation is due, of course, to my mentors: Fran Martin and Vera Mackie. I would like to express my gratitude to Fran Martin for inspiring so much of my intellectual...

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Note to the Reader

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p. xiii

Japanese names are provided in Japanese order (family name followed by given name), unless the individual has published in English and is known by an Anglicised form of their name (given name followed by family name...

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1. Introduction: Ways of Knowing Japan’s Queer Culture

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pp. 1-35

Cross-cultural contact often puts a person in a situation in which she or he feels insecure. In contact with another culture, all of a sudden a person’s mode of being is left on shaky ground, creating the feeling of a subtle distance from the previous identity. The person may feel...

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2. Under the Patriotic Gaze: The Emergence of Non-Normative Sexual Discourses in Post-War Japan

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pp. 37-74

In his meticulous historical work, Embracing Defeat (1999), John Dower succinctly summarises a popular observation of Japan’s defeat by the West made by some critics immediately after the Second World War. As Dower suggests, it is normally assumed that Japanese people...

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3. Hybridised Whiteness in ‘Rose’: The Displacement of Racialised/Gendered Discourse in a Japanese Queer Magazine in the 1970s

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pp. 75-100

In the previous chapter, I have shown that in post-war Japan, the binary trope of the West and Japan was a gendered discourse, and played a pivotal role in mediating the identity politics of Japan. The colonial gendered binary, which normally renders Japan as feminine...

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4. Allegorising the Erotic: Transforming Intercultural Queer Desires in John Treat’s Great Mirrors Shattered

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pp. 101-126

Previous chapters have examined the various ways in which the crosscultural binary trope of ‘East’ and ‘West’ has been constantly redefined and rearticulated in Japan’s queer culture so as to serve local needs. The ‘contact zone’ between Japanese queer culture and that of the West...

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5. Associative Identity Politics: Unmasking the Multi-Layered Formation of Queer Male Selves in 1990s Japan

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pp. 127-154

The decade of the 1990s was a critical period for the establishment and rapid growth of Japanese gay studies. The bulk of works produced by writers and academics who were directly engaged in the gay liberation movement developed scholarship that was sometimes collaborative...

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6. Japanese Male-Queer Cyberspace and Global Flows: Realising Queer Japan through the Imagination

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pp. 155-176

In Chapter 5, I argued that the binary opposition of ‘Japan’ versus the ‘West’ is strategically taken up in the Japanese gay men’s coming-out narratives that emerged during the 1990s. In line with previous chapters, what is important to recognise is that the binary does not always...

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7. Conclusion: On Cross-Cultural Contacts and Queer Desire

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pp. 177-189

Can we discuss identity in the context of cross-cultural contacts? To put it in different terms, when we say we analyse identity, do we really look at what identity is? Or is it the case that we are often discussing the footprints of a certain mode of being or sense of belonging that...

Notes

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pp. 191-195

Bibliography

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pp. 197-210

Index

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pp. 211-216