Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Author's Note

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vi-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

Introduction to the Paperback Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xvi

Hong Kong owes a great deal to Sir Alexander Grantham. He was the territory’s longest serving Governor until exceeded, by the short period of one month, by another of Hong Kong’s great post-War Governors, Sir Murray MacLehose (later Lord MacLehose of Beoch). Grantham took over as Governor after the brief return of Sir Mark ...

Part One: Pre-war Days

read more

1. Hong Kong, 1922-1935

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-19

ON a bright December morning in 1922, a few days before Christmas, the good ship City of York was steaming through the China Sea as she approached Hong Kong. On deck stood two new Cadets of the government administration, Thomas Megarry and myself, eagerly watching the approach to our destination and admiring the panorama of sea and sky and land spread out before us....

read more

2. Bermuda, 1935-1938

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-29

BERMUDA has the distinction of being mentioned by Shakespeare, when in The Tempest Ariel says to Prospero: ' ... thou call'dst me up at midnight to fetch dew from the still vexed Bermoothes. . . '. The islands were discovered by the Spaniard, Juan de Bermudez-hence the name-but Spain never claimed or occupied them, probably because the submerged coral reefs surrounding them made the islands exceedingly hazardous to ...

read more

3. Jamaica, 1938-1941

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 30-44

THE name 'Jamaica' comes from the Arawak 'Xaymaca', meaning 'Land of Springs', and indeed Jamaica is a land of springs. Springs are everywhere and rivers tumble through mountain gorges or emerge swiftly from the tropical forests to plunge in waterfalls to the sea. The Arawaks, a gentle friendly people, were the original inhabitants. Alas, they proved to be too gentle to withstand...

Part Two: War Years

read more

4. Nigeria, 1942-1944

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-67

WE arrived at New York in the middle of November 1941 and at once set about getting the necessary inoculations against yellow fever, smallpox, typhoid, cholera and other tropical diseases. We also had to make arrangements for passages to Nigeria which was easier said than done in war time, but we managed to secure berths on one of the Grace Line ships going to Lagos....

read more

5. Fiji and the South Pacific, 1945-1947

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 68-96

I had always hoped that one day I would be posted to Fiji and my appetite was whetted by hearing Sir Arthur Richards, who had been Governor there before going to Jamaica, talk about the islands and the people, both of whom he loved. But the prospects at the moment seemed remote. The Governor, Sir Philip Mitchell, had been in office two years only and the normal term for a governorship...

Part Three: Hong Kong, 1947-1957

read more

6. Return to Port, 1947-1957

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-135

WE left England for Hong Kong in July 1947, but unlike my voyage out a quarter of a century before, the 'boat' by which we now travelled was a flying one. The five-day journey was pleasant and uneventful, but as we neared our destination I felt an inner excitement and prayed that I should be able to cope with the many problems facing the Colony...

read more

7. Communist China

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 136-194

ON 1st October 1949, the Chinese communists declared themselves to be the lawful government of China. Why did China go communist? This is a question to which different answers are given. Some say, because China was betrayed. That answer in itself poses another question: betrayed by whom? By the Democratic administration in the United States? Others say...

read more

8. Retrospect

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-200

APART from the difficulty over the closure of the Naval Dockyard, 1957 was a relatively quiet year. It was also my last in Hong Kong: a good point, therefore, from which to look back in retrospect at the ten years since I had arrived as Governor; at what had been achieved, at what had not been achieved, and at the change in our relationship with China. So far as purely internal affairs...

Images

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. P1-P20

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-205