Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-ix

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xiv

Holy Scripture was accepted as the principal foundation of authority in the late medieval church. Everyone—popes, theologians, and lawyers— was bound by the divine truth it conveyed. No teaching or practice could . . .

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xvi

This book has been quite a few years in the making and has undergone numerous changes along the way, both in content and in perspective. It is a work of historical theology, which may help in small ways to inform . . .

read more

Chapter 1: Facets of Authority in the Late Medieval Church

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-53

This introductory chapter addresses the authoritative status that Holy Scripture enjoyed in the late medieval church. More specifically, though, it provides a look at the ways in which scripture was understood in itself, . . .

read more

Chapter 2: The Indignant Master

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-91

John Wyclif was above all else a medieval theologian, which is to say that he was thoroughly steeped in the long-held assumptions and practices of the university masters. Having earned his doctorate by about 1372, Wyclif . . .

read more

Chapter 3: The Ambivalent Friar

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 92-116

Having examined John Wyclif ’s view on scripture and authority, we can turn now to his critics. This chapter looks at the Franciscan theologian William Woodford and the objections he raised to Wyclif ’s exegetical . . .

read more

Chapter 4: Ad Fontes (?)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-149

The Carmelite theologian Thomas Netter earned his doctorate at Oxford in 1411 and just a few years later, in 1414, was elected prior pro - vincial of the Carmelites in England. His connection to William Woodford . . .

read more

Chapter 5: A Falling Out

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 150-188

There had been a long history of reform in Bohemia that predated John Wyclif and the subsequent dissemination of his works in the region. I cannot delve into the history of Bohemian reform here, but it must be . . .

read more

Chapter 6: Approaching Final Authority

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-221

As noted in the previous chapter, an ardent desire for the reform of the church in head and members was not confined to Hussites and Wyc - liffites. Indeed, leaders of the conciliarist movement, such as . . .

read more

Chapter 7: The Enduring Dilemma

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 222-235

We have observed a protracted debate among medieval university masters that seems at times almost impossible to resolve. Perhaps Jean Gerson’s confidence in the infallibility of a general council could offer the . . .

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 236-287

Bibliovault

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 288-301

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 302-320