Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This project was made possible with the help and support of many people and institutions. The Japan Foundation generously funded two research trips to Japan. The Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, College of Arts and Letters, University of Notre Dame, provided support...

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Note on Language

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p. ix

Japanese names appear in this book with the family name first. Names of scholars who have published in English, however, follow the form given in their publications, in most cases with the family name last. Following Japanese convention, certain artists and writers are designated by their...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-13

In Japan in the early 1970s, a transformation took place in the popular culture consumed by teenage girls. Young women artists, inspired by the atmosphere of youthful rebellion and creative experimentation at the time, took over the genre of shōjo manga, or comic books for girls, and changed it to address the concerns of teenage girls...

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1. The Emergence of the Shōjo and the Discourse of Spiritual Love in Meiji Literature

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pp. 14-28

Representations of the teenage girl as a recurring figure in fiction (and public discourse more generally) begin to appear around the 1880s, or the second decade of the Meiji period. The schoolgirl (joshi gakusei or jogakusei) was one of several new classes of people that emerged in...

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2. Prewar Girls’ Culture (Shōjo Bunka), 1910–1937

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pp. 29-57

In the first decades of the twentieth century, a distinct and separate girls’ culture (shōjo bunka) arose within the homosocial world of single-sex secondary schools and found its public expression in girls’ magazines. Prewar girls’ culture coopted the discourse of spiritual love...

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3. Narrative and Visual Aesthetics of Prewar Girls’ Magazines

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pp. 58-81

In the 1920s and 1930s, readers accepted magazines such as Shōjo no tomo, Shōjo club, and Shōjo gahō as the authentic representation of girls’ culture, a discrete discourse premised on a private, closed world of girls. In demonstrating how those magazines promoted the perception...

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4. The Formation of Postwar Shōjo Manga, 1950–1969

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pp. 82-100

Manga as it exists in Japan today is a postwar phenomenon, and this is true for shōjo manga as well as for other genres.1 The distinctive format and look of what is now the shōjo manga genre emerged in the early 1970s. The key features of shōjo manga are initial publication in...

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5. The Revolution in 1970s Shōjo Manga

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pp. 101-136

Shòjo manga today is not only the primary locus of girls’ culture, but because of its mainstream, widespread popularity, it has become an important site of cultural production, as popular series inspire animation, films, TV shows, music, stage plays, and novels. Manga in general comprise...

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Afterword

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pp. 137-141

When I first began to research shōjo manga over a decade ago, there was little scholarship on manga of any kind written in English, and manga translations had not yet found a foothold in the US marketplace. While translations of shōjo manga have at last become popular with North...

Notes

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pp. 143-155

Bibliography

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pp. 157-166

Index

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pp. 167-179

Image Plates

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pp. 181-184