Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

The research and writing of this book were supported by a grant from the American Philosophical Society and by grants from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Office of the Vice President for Research . . .

Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xi

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Introduction: Modern and Medieval Contexts

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pp. 1-26

On 31 May 1310, at the Place de Grève in Paris, the Dominican inquisitor William of Paris read out a sentence that declared Marguerite “called Porete” to be a relapsed heretic, released her to secular authority for . . .

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Chapter 1: Background to a Beguine, Becoming an Angel

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pp. 27-38

One of the trial documents from 1310 refers to Guiard of Cressonessart as “arising from himself,” presumably as a way of attributing his “heresy” to his own stubborn imagination. The description seems. . .

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Chapter 2: Seven Churchmen and a Beguine

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pp. 39-62

Marguerite Porete has often been portrayed as a solitary figure whose stubborn disdain for churchmen set her on a certain path to the stake. The evidence, however, reveals another picture. Although the hostility . . .

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Chapter 3: The Inquisitor

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pp. 63-84

While Marguerite Porete was battling church authorities in the Low Countries and Guiard of Cressonessart was developing his angelic mission, William of Paris was enjoying a steady ascent toward the upper . . .

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Chapter 4: First Steps

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pp. 85-103

Marguerite Porete and William of Paris had more in common in the fall of 1308 than one might think. Both must have felt deceived by recent events. Marguerite had patiently gathered support for her writings but . . .

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Chapter 5: Philadelphia Story

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pp. 105-124

William of Paris must surely have communicated the canonists’ decision to Marguerite and Guiard and spelled out—if this was necessary— what the possibility of relaxation to the secular arm implied. . . .

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Chapter 6: Twenty-One Theologians and a Book

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pp. 125-144

Guiard’s decision to testify and repent saved his life. But he had failed in his mission to defend Marguerite Porete. William of Paris, however, did not immediately take further steps concerning the issue of . . .

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Chapter 7: Toward the Stake

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pp. 145-166

The 11 April condemnation of extracts from Marguerite’s book had not materially altered the standing of the case against Marguerite in her person. Her status remained what it had been since 3 April, when . . .

Epilogue I

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pp. 167-175

Epilogue II

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pp. 177-191

Epilogue III

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pp. 193-207

Appendix A

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pp. 209-231

Appendix B

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pp. 233-238

Appendix C

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pp. 239-247

Notes

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pp. 248-362

Bibliography

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pp. 363-395

Index

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pp. 396-408