Cover

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Title Page

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Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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p. ix

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Foreword

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pp. xi-xviii

Our situation was extremely serious because it immediately followed the arrest of our parents in Marseille on May 15, 1944, but infinitely more comfortable than those recounted in this book. And as there was no “return” of our parents, there was also no opportunity to grieve, no rites of passage, no condolences. Little by little, our hope faded into an endless wait. ...

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Introduction

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pp. xix-xxiii

We are here because of those who—sometimes without even being fully aware—refused, either passively or actively, to collaborate with genocide and who helped save the Jewish children condemned by the Nazis to death solely because of their origin—as were their parents and families—and who were pursued and tracked as we were in the occupied countries during the war. ...

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1. Simon Marjenberg

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pp. 1-18

My name is Simon Marjenberg. I was born September 1, 1941, so I am sixty-one and one-half years old. I was born in Belgium. I came to France in 1945. I’m going to start by talking about my grandparents, then my parents, to give a family history. My paternal grandparents came from Warsaw. My grandfather was a very Orthodox rabbi. He came to Brussels, probably about 1930–1931, ...

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2. Charles Zelwer

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pp. 19-44

... the other testimonials rich in dramatic episodes, the few memories I have of the time I was hidden could be considered mild compared to what others experienced. But the physically secure situation I had after being separated from my parents at the age of eighteen months was so destructive it took sixty years to free myself from its weight. Affected by a psychological handicap, the cause of which ...

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3. No

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pp. 45-70

... so there were four of us: my parents, my brother, and I. My father and mother were cousins; they had the same last name: Kuperman. My father was born, as was my mother, in Szydlowiec, located between Radom and Kielce, in Poland. Both of them later returned to Poland since Szydlowiec is only about two hundred kilometers from Auschwitz. ...

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4. Francis Bailly

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pp. 71-94

My mother and father met in 1929. My mother was a secretary at the newspaper where my father was working, and from what I have been able to find out, it was love at first sight for the two of them. They dated until, having decided to marry and having had to surmount certain family obstacles that I will talk about again later, they decided to ...

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5. Arnold Rochfeld

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pp. 95-114

I was born in Paris on June 29, 1938, so I’m going to be sixty-five years old. I’ve had a rather unusual professional life. Somewhat pressured by my family, I first studied accounting and started to work as an accountant’s assistant, but that didn’t suit me at all. Then I did my military service where I met the people who I ended up studying ...

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6. Danielle Bailly

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pp. 115-142

... born on March 23, 1937, in Paris.1 My father was Polish and my mother, of Ukrainian origin, was French. My father, Thadée Schneck, was born in 1904 in Galicia—home of klezmer music—at Lvov. This military town, poorly governed throughout history, was Polish, then Austrian, and finally Ukrainian—first in the USSR, then in the independent ...

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7. Dani

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pp. 143-158

... born in September 1936 in Paris. My parents met in France, both of them having come there from Warsaw in 1927. My paternal grandfather moved up a long way from his birth into a poor family in Brest-Litovsk. A photo taken about 1920 shows his father (my great-grandfather) bearded, with a cap and wearing a shapeless ...

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8. Nelly Scharapan

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pp. 159-174

As for my grandparents, my maternal grandmother, Rajzla Witman, was born in Warsaw, Poland, of modest origins. She had brothers and sisters, but I know nothing about them. My maternal grandfather, Mo

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9.

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pp. 175-188

born in 1934 on August 16. The incidents I experienced during the war were minor compared to the atrocities suffered by thousands (millions) of human beings. This no doubt explains why it was only two years ago that I realized that I, too, had been a hidden child. Despite numerous conversations and interviews I had held on this subject, ...

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10. Rachel Jedinak

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pp. 189-208

... born on April 30, 1934. My parents were both originally from Warsaw, but they arrived separately from Poland in the 1920s when they were very young. They met and married in Paris. My sister Louise was born in 1929. I knew my paternal grandparents and several of their children—my uncles, aunts, and cousins. They all lived in Paris except for one uncle, ...

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11. Daniel Krakowski

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pp. 209-234

I was born in France, in Paris in the Twelfth Arrondissement on April 26, 1932. I will be seventy-one years old in a few days. I am culturally one hundred percent French, having lived at home very little and having scarcely known my parents. I heard my parents and other people speaking Yiddish but I never learned it. ...

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12. Willy Swiczka (1931–1999)

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pp. 235-240

... born of Jewish parents in Strasbourg in 1931. I was among those who left Alsace in the first exodus in 1939. Later, the Alsatians who were not Jewish returned saying (not all of them, of course), “We are going home; you Jews stay where you are!” It was the real breaking point—the point of no-return. My family settled in La Châtre. ...

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13.

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pp. 241-256

... no memory of my grandparents, so I rely on those of my older sister Szidi. My paternal grandfather Bendet died before I was born, at only forty-five years of age. My father often told us about my grandfather’s difficult working life in his village of Olvös, Hungary. He was a cobbler and had to feed his wife and five children. He was extremely ...

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14. Nicole Eizner

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pp. 257-282

I was born February 10, 1931, in Paris. I am a sociologist. I worked for CNRS and, other than during the war, I’ve always lived in Paris. My father was an officiant rabbi at the synagogue on rue des Tournelles in the Fourth Arrondissement of Paris, and my mother, who came from a family of small business owners, was a housewife. My maternal grandparents were born in Belarus and came to France ...

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15. Odette Kozuch

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pp. 283-306

... name is Odette Kozuch. I was born Odette Diament. We were a family of eight: my parents; my sisters Suzanne, Simone, and Fernande; my brothers Isidore and Georges; and I. What led me to speak today is the fact that in a few years there will be no one left to say “I was there” or “I lived it.” I believe we must leave something for posterity ...

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16. Gaby Netchine-Grynberg

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pp. 307-324

You have invited me to hunt for a memory—to recall the memories of someone who has disappeared—the child, the adolescent that I was in another time, in another place. A familiar child whom I certainly knew, but from whom I have—or who herself has—progressively moved away. This is, of course, banal, but how can I re-create for you, ...

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17. Philippe Fouquey

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pp. 350-348

... transcribed interview with me conducted by Danielle Bailly on March 28, 2003, and which I rewrote, revealed to me certain things about my perception of my countrymen; it also brought to my attention that I was incapable of putting my family history together with the history of the Jews of Alsace and Lorraine, where the family originated. I ...

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18. Serge Netchine

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pp. 349-356

During the time of hiding, I was not separated from my parents. Despite the difficulties, we were able to maintain a minimal level of emotional and material security. I appreciated the countryside in the Béarn region where we took refuge after the Vel’ d’Hiv’ Roundup. I followed a regular course of study at school. I was never depressed, thanks to the strong and confident political convictions ...

Chronology

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pp. 357-362

Glossary

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pp. 363-368

French Acronyms

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pp. 369-370

Notes

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pp. 371-376

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 377-382

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Translator’s Note

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pp. 383-384

Through mutual friend Judy Stein, Danielle Bailly and I began a collaborative effort, quickly turned friendship, to bring the book to the American reading public. I thank her, along with Larry Theye, Erica Hughes, Dani

Biographical Notes

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p. 385