Cover

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pp. 1-1

Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. iii-iv

Contents

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pp. vii-vii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-xi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xv

My early impressions of Yōga, the “Western painting” of Japan, were far from positive. When I worked on the curatorial staff of the Seibu Art Museum in Tokyo in the early 1980s, my enthusiasm for the avant-gardes of the day eclipsed sympathy for Japanese oil paintings of the early and midtwentieth ...

Note on Translations and Names

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pp. xvii-xvii

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Introduction: Yōga, the Intercultural Art of Embodiment and Disembodiment

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pp. 1-24

In one of his last films, the celebrated director Kurosawa Akira, who started his career in the 1920s as a Yōga-ka, or “Western painter,” created a poignant expression of Japanese yearning for Western painting in a segment called “Crows.”1 An anonymous young Japanese painter peers longingly at a group of ...

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Chapter 1. Strong Flesh at the Ready: Body and Self in Self-Portraiture

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pp. 25-62

Among the various genres of the Yōga movement—portraiture, still life, the nude, landscape, and battle scenery—self-portraiture produced the most intimate manifestations of a contradiction that is endemic to Yōga discourse. How can a sense of nativity be embodied in a medium that was stigmatized ...

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Chapter 2. Accelerating the Heartbeat: Erotic Nationalism and the Japanese Nude

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pp. 63-99

The subject of this chapter, the Yōga genre of the female nude, is surprisingly similar to the self-portraiture discussed in the previous chapter. For the male Yōga painter of the female nude typically assumed the stance of Pygmalion, endowing the bodies he painted with aesthetic properties he desired for ...

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Chapter 3. Creating Oriental Beauty: Chinese Passages to Imperial Yōga [Contains Image Plates]

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pp. 100-127

The previous two chapters have demonstrated how the Eurocentrism of the Yōga self-portrait and nude was neutralized by transferring the focus of these genres from European bodies to Japanese bodies, paradigmatically those of the male Self and the desirable female. It might seem that endowing Yōga with a ...

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Chapter 4. The Feast of Fierce Massacre: Maximum Disembodiment

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pp. 128-162

This chapter charts a dramatically different direction in the development of the Yōga movement from the preceding chapters. Th us far, early twentieth- century Yōga has been explained in terms of the fitful quest for ideal embodiment—whether the artist’s own body in self-portraiture, desirable erotic ...

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Epilogue: The Collapse of Yōga Embodiment

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pp. 163-168

The urge toward maximum disembodiment in Yōga painting between the mid-1930s and the mid-1950s was to be the last chapter of the Yōga movement. The four interrelated components of Yōga embodiment—the illustrated body, oil-pigment matière, the sense of the painter’s somatic presence, and ...

Notes

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pp. 169-194

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 195-206

Index

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pp. 207-217