Frontmatter

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Translating Investments

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

This project began in 1995–1996 at the National Humanities Center, where I was appointed the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow. I subsequently spent two months on a grant from the Huntington Library for additional work on its third chapter. Essentially, I finished the book...

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Chapter 1: Renaissance Metaphor and the Dynamic of Cultural Change: An Introductory Road Map

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pp. 1-7

This book studies the functioning of metaphor in Tudor and early Stuart culture. Accordingly, its chapters treat a range of disciplines, including language, religion, rhetoric, politics, literature, and economics. Also and inevitably, it touches the present, raising questions about the position of language...

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Chapter 2: Translating Investments: The Metaphoricity of Language, Hamlet, and 2 Henry IV

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pp. 8-35

In this chapter, my argument, which is historical in orientation, suggests a way of conceiving language that informs the metaphoricity of Renaissance writings and bears on our reading of them. In doing so, it also addresses contemporary debates about the metaphoricity of language and their...

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Chapter 3: Language and History in the Reformation: Translating Matter to Metaphor in the Sacrament

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pp. 36-60

What follows further concerns two interlocking interests: the involvement of language in history, history in language, and herein the particular role of language, especially figurative language, in the early reforms of the established church in Tudor England. Still more specifically, my concerns in this...

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Chapter 4: Donne’s Tropic Awareness: Metaphor, Metonymy, and Devotions upon Emergent Occasions

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pp. 61-77

To ask in what ways and to what extent John Donne might have been aware of the dazzling tropes he used would seem a question whose answer is selfevident. Historically, however, this is a real question, and one bearing on faith and ideology. To take an obvious instance, the correspondences...

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Chapter 5: Vesting Significance and Authority: The Vestiarian Controversy under Cranmer and Its Treatment by Foxe

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pp. 78-111

That a particular outfit or a more general style of clothing should make a ‘‘statement’’ is a familiar enough idea in the twenty-first century. It assumes that clothing, like language, participates in a system of signs, and that plain clothing, such as chinos or blue jeans, can be every bit as much a statement...

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Chapter 6: Busirane’s Place: The House of Abusive Rhetoric in The Faerie Queene

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pp. 112-128

That the House of Busirane, culmination of the 1590 edition of Spenser’s Faerie Queene, should be a ‘‘house’’ in the rhetorical sense—a rhetorical place or topos—came with the surprise of delayed recognition to me, as well as to the audiences with whom I have shared and explored this...

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Chapter 7: Catachresis and Metaphor: ‘‘Be Bold, Be Bold, Be Not Too Bold’’ in the Latin Rhetorical Tradition and Its Renaissance Adaptors

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pp. 129-165

Twice in recent chapters, I have invoked Richard Lanham’s definition of catachresis as a wrenching of metaphor or an extravagant use of it, in any case, as a violent (mis)use of language. Qualifying Lanham’s definition, I have also observed the appreciation of traditional rhetoric...

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Chapter 8: Exchanging Values: The Economic and Rhetorical World Seen by Gerrard de Malynes, Merchant

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pp. 166-216

In 1622, Gerrard de Malynes, self-styled ‘‘Merchant,’’ published his magnum opus entitled Consuetudo, vel Lex Mercatoria, or The Antient Law-Merchant. While concerned with mercantile law (and nowadays found in law libraries), Lex Mercatoria focuses primarily on mercantile custom. It fundamentally engages economic issues, as do Malynes’ earlier writings, on which...

Notes

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pp. 217-288

Works Cited

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pp. 289-310

Index

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pp. 311-324