In this Book

Givenness and God
summary
After the subject and beyond Heideggerian ontology,Marion suggests, there is the sheer givenness ofphenomena without condition. In theology, this liberationmeans rethinking God in terms of phenomena such aslove, gift, and excess. In addition to an important essayby Marion, The Reason of the Gift, and a dialoguebetween Marion and Richard Kearney, this book containsstimulating essays by ten other contributors: Lilian Alweiss,Eoin Cassidy, Mark Dooley, Brian Elliott, Ian Leask,Shane Mackinlay, Derek Morrow, John O'Donohue,Joseph S. O'Leary, and Felix a Murchadha. After the subject and beyond Heideggerian ontology, Marion suggests, there is the givenness of phenomena without condition. In theology, this liberation means rethinking God in terms of phenomena such as love, gift, and excess. In addition to an important essay by Marion, The Reason of the Gift, and a dialogue between Marion and Richard Kearney, this book contains stimulating essays by ten other contributors: Lilian Alweiss, Eoin Cassidy, Mark Dooley, Brian Elliott, Ian Leask, Shane Mackinlay, Derek Morrow, John O'Donohue, Joseph S. O'Leary, and Felix a Murchadha.

Table of Contents

  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Givenness and God
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. ix
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. xi-xiii
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. xv-xvi
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-8
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  1. Part I: Marion on Descartes, Husserl, and Heidegger
  2. pp. 9-10
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  1. Chapter 1: The Conceptual Idolatry of Descartes’s Gray Ontology: An Epistemology ‘‘Without Being’’
  2. pp. 11-36
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  1. Chapter 2: I Am, I Exist
  2. pp. 37-46
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  1. Chapter 3: Hubris and Humility: Husserl’s Reduction and Givenness
  2. pp. 47-68
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  1. Chapter 4: Glory, Idolatry, Kairos: Revelation and the Ontological Difference in Marion
  2. pp. 69-86
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  1. Chapter 5: Reduced Phenomena and Unreserved Debts in Marion’s Reading of Heidegger
  2. pp. 87-98
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  1. Part II: Marion: Gift and Reception
  2. pp. 99-100
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  1. Chapter 6: The Reason of the Gift
  2. pp. 101-134
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  1. Chapter 7: The Gift: A Trojan Horse in the Citadel of Phenomenology?
  2. pp. 135-166
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  1. Chapter 8: Phenomenality in the Middle: Marion, Romana, and the Hermeneutics of the Event
  2. pp. 167-181
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  1. Chapter 9: The Dative Subject (and the ‘‘Principle of Principles’’)
  2. pp. 182-189
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  1. Chapter 10: Marion’s Ambition of Transcendence
  2. pp. 190-198
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  1. Part III: Marion and Beyond
  2. pp. 199-200
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  1. Chapter 11: Le phénoméne érotique: Augustinian Resonances in Marion’s Phenomenology of Love
  2. pp. 201-219
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  1. Chapter 12: Hermeneutics of the Possible God
  2. pp. 220-242
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  1. Chapter 13: Giving More
  2. pp. 243-257
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  1. Chapter 14: The Absent Threshold: An Eckhartian Afterword
  2. pp. 258-284
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 285-340
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 341-344
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 345-346
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  1. Other Books in Fordham's Perspectives in Continental Philosophy Series
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