Frontmatter

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Title Page

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Table of Contents

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p. vii

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Foreword / Marie-Louise Mallet

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pp. ix-xiii

Jacques Derrida often expressed his intention to one day put together in a large work the texts he had written on ‘‘the animal.’’ Although he had his heart set on such a project, various pressing tasks persistently pushed it aside. In 1997, for the ten-day Cerisy conference on his work whose title, ‘‘The Autobiographical Animal,’’ he had expressly chosen, he wrote ...

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Chapter 1: The Animal That Therefore I Am (More to Follow)

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pp. 1-51

In the beginning, I would like to entrust myself to words that, were it possible, would be naked. Naked in the first place—but this is in order to announce already that I plan to speak endlessly of nudity and of the nude in philosophy. Starting from Genesis. I would like to choose words that are, to begin with, naked, ...

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Chapter 2: ‘‘But as for me, who am I (following)?’’

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pp. 52-118

‘‘But as for me, who am I (following)?’’ Whether I address this question to you or ask it, in the first instance, of myself, it should concern only me, myself, me alone. And every response that I give to it will belong to a self-definition, as a first autobiographical gesture involving only the writing of my life, myself, me alone. Yet you well know that this question is so much older than me: ‘‘But as for me, who am I?’’ It shows ...

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Chapter 3: And Say the Animal Responded?: to Jacques Lacan

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pp. 119-140

Would an ethics like that Levinas attempts be sufficient to recall the subject to its being-subject, its being-host or -hostage, that is to say, its being subjected- to-the-other, to the Wholly Other or to every single other? I don’t think so. More than that is required to break with the Cartesian tradition of the animal-machine without language and without response.1 It takes more than that, even ...

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Chapter 4: ‘‘I don’t know why we are doing this’’

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pp. 141-160

I don’t know why we are doing this . . . or where you are getting your stamina from [laughter] . . . to be able to continue to listen to me! Don’t think for a moment that I am insisting on having the last word, or on being not only ‘‘the last of the Jews,’’ or ‘‘the last of the eschatologists,’’ but really ‘‘the last to speak,’’ the last of the last, speaking. By no means, ...

Notes

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pp. 161-176