Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Acknowledgments are due to a large number of individuals and organizations for assistance on this volume, and even more for assistance at various stages in the Collected Works project. First of all acknowledgments are due to the Henry Bonham Carter Will Trust for permission to publish Nightingale original manuscripts...

Dramatis Personae

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p. xi

List of Illustrations

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p. xii

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Florence Nightingale: A Précis of Her Life

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pp. xiii-xvi

Florence Nightingale was born in Florence, Italy, 1820, the second daughter of wealthy English parents taking an extended European wedding trip. She was raised in England at country homes, Lea Hurst, in Derbyshire, and Embley, in Hampshire. She was educated largely by her father, who had studied classics at Trinity College, Cambridge. ...

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Introduction to Volume 8

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pp. 1-9

Nightingale is one of the most famous women of all time. She was greatly revered in her own lifetime and indeed for some decades after her death she was a symbol of virtue and feminine heroism. In recent decades all this has changed, and she has been attacked from within the nursing profession, by medical doctors, historians and other academics. ...

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Key to Editing

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pp. 11-14

All the manuscript material in the Collected Works has been carefully transcribed and verified (see Appendix E: Research Methods and Sources, in Life and Family, for a description of the process of obtaining and processing this information). Illegible words and passages are so indicated, with [illeg], or [?] inserted to indicate our best reading of the word or words in question. ...

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Nightingale on Women

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pp. 15-138

When Nightingale began her work as a nurse in 1853 there were no women doctors practising in Britain or America, or indeed anywhere requiring a Western, science-based medical education. Elizabeth Blackwell was the first British woman to practise medicine, on obtaining an American medical degree. ...

Midwifery

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Midwifery Training at King’s College Hospital

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pp. 141-408

Midwifery nurse training at King’s College Hospital was the second major undertaking of the ‘‘Nightingale Fund,’’ the money raised by public subscription in her honour for her Crimean work—the first was the establishment of the ‘‘Nightingale School’’ at St Thomas’ Hospital. ...

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Introductory Notes on Lying-in Institutions

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pp. 249-408

Nightingale in the preface, right after the whimsical dedication to Socrates’ mother, ‘‘without permission,’’ sets out the problem of the midwifery ward at King’s College Hospital. The circumstances of each of the deaths that occurred from 1862-67 are listed. ...

Prostitution, the Contagious Diseases Acts and the Treatment of Syphilitic Prostitutes

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The Regulation of Prostitution by the Contagious Diseases Acts

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pp. 411-515

The Contagious Diseases Acts that Nightingale and a small group of people so vigorously opposed were first legislated in 1864, as a means of addressing the growing problem of sexually transmitted diseases in the army.1 They targeted women prostitutes, never their male customers. ...

Women Friends, Relatives, Colleagues and Acquaintances

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Women Friends, Relatives, Colleagues and Acquaintances

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pp. 519-524

Nightingale had a large number of girl and women friends as a child and young woman, largely the daughters of family friends who visited the Nightingales and whom they visited. There is cor respondence surviving to and from only a few of them: Henrietta Wyvill and a Swedish friend, Selma Benedicks, in European Travels...

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Older Women Friends

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pp. 525-650

There is relatively little surviving correspondence with Selina Bracebridge (1803-74), given the length and importance of their friendship. Mrs Bracebridge was Nightingale’s ‘‘spiritual mother,’’ a supporter of her vocation when her family was most hostile, a woman who shared her faith and took her on wonderful trips. Were many letters destroyed or merely lost? ...

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Contemporary Women Friends

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pp. 651-790

Nightingale met Elizabeth Herbert (1822-1911) and her husband in Rome and spent much time with them in the winter of 1847-48; there are biographical sketches on both of them in European Travels. Sidney Herbert’s magnificent home, Wilton, was close enough to Embley for the friends to visit. ...

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Notable and Royal Women Acquaintances

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pp. 791-846

When Nightingale met Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) and her husband, Samuel Gridley Howe (1801-76), in 1844 the couple were on their wedding trip. Julia Ward Howe was Nightingale’s nearly exact contemporary, Dr Howe a distinguished physician and veteran of the Greek Wars of Independence, twenty years their senior. ...

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Younger Women Friends

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pp. 847-972

Adeline Paulina Irby (1831-1911)1 was a slightly younger friend and colleague, with enormous courage and dedication to her own causes, for which Nightingale greatly admired her. Irby addressed Nightingale as ‘‘Florence’’ (relying on their mutual association with Kaiserswerth, where Nightingale was ‘‘Schwester Florence’’)...

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Women Servants and Villagers

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pp. 973-1012

We begin with letters about various servants or issues about hiring and managing them, organized chronologically, and then go on to sets of letters to particular women employees, including a governess to the Shore Smith family, who became a friend, and cottagers or villagers at Lea, Embley and Claydon. ...

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Nuns

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pp. 1013-1030

Along and warm correspondence with Mary Clare Moore (1814-74), mother superior of the Convent of Mercy, Bermondsey, and a much-esteemed nursing colleague in the Crimean War, is reported in Theology (3:276-98), with a biographical sketch (3:648-49). Further correspondence will appear in the Crimean War volume. ...

Appendixes

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pp. 1031-1053

Bibliography

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pp. 1055-1063

Index

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pp. 1065-1085