COVER

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CONTENTS

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p. vii

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. ix-x

My first and most immediate thanks go to my incomparable colleagues in the Native American Studies program at Dartmouth College. Colin Calloway, Bruce Duthu, Sergei Kan, Dale Turner, Vera Palmer, and Deb Nichols have been unstintingly generous, warm, and inspiring in ways that I can hardly begin to enumerate. ...

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INTRODUCTION - Reconstructing the South: Region, Tribe, and Sovereignty in the Age of Global Capitalism

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pp. 1-25

At the heart of this book is a challenging claim: that the biracial U.S. South and its Native American survivors have far more in common than geographical proximity. It is not difficult to recognize the myriad ways that both groups are haunted by their own private, separate histories of sweeping loss and crippling nostalgia, but we have yet to investigate the moments...

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CHAPTER ONE - Reconstructing Loss: Native Americans, Nostalgia, and Tribalography in Southern Literature

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pp. 26-71

To read southern literature since the Civil War is to confront a world saturated with Indian characters, themes, and references and yet uncannily absent of “real” Indian survivors. These ghostly signifiers appear with particular force and frequency in the period between world wars, a precipitous moment, Annette Trefzer argues, for activating...

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CHAPTER TWO - Red, Black, and Southern: Alliances and Erasures in the Biracial South

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pp. 72-117

In 1991 an African American writer and director named Julie Dash released a highly acclaimed independent film about a remote family of West African Gullah people in the secluded Sea Islands of South Carolina.1 Set in 1902, Daughters of the Dust (1991) follows the Peazant family as several members of the clan prepare to leave the isolated island community...

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CHAPTER THREE - Reckoning the Future: Capitalism, Culture, and the Production of Community

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pp. 118-171

Lurking at the occluded heart of the South’s mightiest triumphs and tragedies is a torturous relationship to the almighty dollar. From the Removal of the Five Civilized Tribes to the erection of plantation dynasties, from the indignities of Reconstruction to the savage inequities of Jim Crow and the eventual rise of the Sun Belt industry...

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CHAPTER FOUR - Excavating the World: Unearthing the Past and Finding the Future on Southern Soil

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pp. 172-205

What we have seen so far in Reconstructing the Native South are the shadows of a shared history, yet under a common economy of exclusion and erasure, the result has been antagonism and separatism more often than solidarity. To produce a meaningful new appraisal of community, both southern and Native, requires us to deal soberly with the losses and thefts of contact...

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CONCLUSION: The South in the Indian and the Indian in the South

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pp. 206-210

In a 2005 New York Times Magazine article titled “The Newest Indians,” journalist Jack Hitt describes his visit to the annual powwow of a Cherokee tribe of northeast Alabama near Jasper. The event was newsworthy because it featured a tribe that has existed as an organization only since 1997; and to Hitt, these Indians do not “look as much like Indians as they do regular Alabama white folks. ...

NOTES

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pp. 211-226

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 227-243

INDEX

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pp. 245-253