In this Book

Personal Names in Asia
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
The world's population negotiates a multiplicity of naming systems. Some are compatible with the "normative" system of the world of passports and identity cards but a great many are not. This is particularly true in Asia, a region with some of the most sophisticated naming devices found anywhere in the world, including nicknames and teknonyms, religious and corporation names, honour and death names, pseudonyms and retirement names, house names and clan names, local and foreign names, official and private names. People across the continent carry multiple names meaningful to different audiences. Some are used only in family relations while others locate individuals in terms of gender, ethnicity, religion, caste, class, and nation. The centrality of names to many of the crucial debates and preoccupations of the modern world — identity, hybridity, migration, nationalism, multi-culturalism, globalization — makes it particularly surprising that there has been little systematic comparative exploration of Asian names and naming systems. This path-breaking volume classifies and theorizes the systems underlying naming practices in Asia, especially in Southeast Asia where systems are abundant and fluid. Using historical and socio-anthropological perspectives, the authors of this exceptionally close collaborative effort show the intricate connections between naming systems, notions of personhood and the prevailing ethos of interpersonal relations. They also show how the peoples of Asia are fashioning new types of naming and different ways of identifying themselves to suit the demands of a changing world

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgements
  2. pp. xi-xii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction1
  2. pp. 1-18
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part I: The Long View
  2. pp. 19-20
  1. Chapter 1: Family Names in Southeast Asian History
  2. pp. 21-36
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 2: Looking for Claveria’s Children: Church, State, Power, and the Individual in Philippine Naming Systems1 during the Late Nineteenth Century
  2. pp. 37-51
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 3: From 居正 Live Righteously and 小蘭 Small Orchid to 建華 Construct China : A Systematic Enquiry into Chinese Naming Practices
  2. pp. 52-76
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 4: Toward a Classification of Naming Systems in Insular Southeast Asia
  2. pp. 77-98
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part II: “Class A”: Simple Egalitarian Societies
  2. pp. 99-100
  1. Chapter 5: Teknonymy, Name-Avoidance, Solidarity, and Individuation among the Bentian of Indonesian Borneo
  2. pp. 101-127
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 6: The Karen Naming System: Identity and Sociocultural Orientations1
  2. pp. 128-149
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 7: Th e Autonomy of Naming: Kinship, Power, and Ethnonymy in the Wa Lands of the Southeast Asia-China Frontier
  2. pp. 150-172
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part III: “Class B”: Competitive Societies
  2. pp. 173-174
  1. Chapter 8: Personal Names and Changing Modes of Inscribing Identity in Sumba, Eastern Indonesia: “Bloody Thursday” in Linguistic and Social Contexts
  2. pp. 175-198
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 9: Who is Your Name?” Naming Paiwan Identities in Contemporary Taiwan
  2. pp. 199-223
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 10: On Sense and Reference in Eastern Indonesian Personal Names: Finding Space for a Sociology of Naming
  2. pp. 224-242
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part IV: “Class C”: Complex Centralized Societies
  2. pp. 243-244
  1. Chapter 11: Names and Name Changing in Early Modern Kyoto, Japan
  2. pp. 245-261
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 12: Personal Identity Complex and Name Changes among the Sinhalese in Sri Lanka
  2. pp. 262-287
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 13: Naming and Chinese Muslim Identities: Boundary-making, Negotiation, and Hybridity in Malaysia1
  2. pp. 288-304
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 305-323
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 324-327
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 328-340
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.