In this Book

When Protest Makes Policy
buy this book Buy This Book in Print
summary
This is a bold and exciting book. There are many fine scholars who look at women's movements, political theorists who make claims about democracy, and policy analysts who do longitudinal treatments or cross-sectional evaluations of various policies. I know of no one, aside from Weldon, who is comfortable with all three of these roles. ---David Meyer, University of California, Irvine What role do social movements play in a democracy? In When Protest Makes Policy, political theorist S. Laurel Weldon demonstrates that social movements provide a hitherto unrecognized and untheorized form of democratic representation and thus offer significant potential for deepening democracy and overcoming social conflict. Through a series of case studies of movements conducted by women, women of color, and workers in the United States and in the OECD countries, Weldon examines processes of representation at the local, state, and national levels. She concludes that, for systematically disadvantaged groups, social movements are just as important as---if not more important than---political parties, interest groups, and the physical presence of group members in legislatures. Indeed, Weldon argues, the effectiveness of social movements suggests that we ought to promote them through public policy. Yet using government policy to catalyze what must be independent movements is a tricky business, fraught with tensions. Weldon proposes that one way to spark such movements is the creation of an advocacy state: a state aimed at furthering the mobilization of marginalized groups both within the governing bodies and in civil society. She concludes with specific policy recommendations for improving the representation of marginalized groups. S. Laurel Weldon is Professor of political science at Purdue University.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Frontmatter
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. 1-9
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  2. pp. ix-xi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. INTRODUCTION: Movements,Marginalization, and Representation
  2. pp. 1-29
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 1: Representing Women in Democratic Policy Processes
  2. pp. 30-56
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 2: Social Movements, Representation, and Family Policy
  2. pp. 57-81
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 3: Intersectionality, Labor, and Representation in the 50 U.S. States
  2. pp. 82-108
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 4: Inclusion, Identity, and Women's Movements: State Policies on Violence against Women of Color
  2. pp. 109-128
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 5: Women’s Movements, Representation, and Civil Society
  2. pp. 129-148
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. CHAPTER 6: The Advocacy State
  2. pp. 149-170
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. APPENDIX
  2. pp. 171-180
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. NOTES
  2. pp. 181-193
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. REFERENCES
  2. pp. 195-222
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. INDEX
  2. pp. 223-231
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.