In this Book

summary
From Czarism and Bolshevism to the current post-communist era, the media in Central Asia has been tightly constrained. Though the governments in the region assert that a free press is permitted to operate, research has shown this to be untrue. In all five former Soviet republics of Central Asia, the media has been controlled, suppressed, punished, and often outlawed. This enlightening collection of essays investigates the reasons why these countries have failed to develop independent and sustainable press systems. It documents the complex relationship between the press and governance, nation-building, national identity, and public policy. In this book, scholars explore the numerous and broad-reaching implications of media control in a variety of contexts, touching on topics such as Internet regulation and censorship, press rights abuses, professional journalism standards and self-censorship, media ownership, ethnic newspapers, blogging, Western broadcasting into the region, and coverage of terrorism.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. Theoretical Foundations for Researching the Roles of the Press in Today’s Central Asia
  2. pp. 1-15
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  1. Part 1: Under the Commissars
  2. p. 17
  1. Soviet Foundations of the Post-Independence Press in Central Asia
  2. pp. 19-32
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  1. Part 2: National Perspectives
  2. p. 33
  1. Oligarchs and Ownership: The Role of Financial-Industrial Groups in Controlling Kazakhstan’s “Independent” Media
  2. pp. 35-57
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  1. Reinforcing Authoritarianism through Media Control: The Case of Post-Soviet Turkmenistan
  2. pp. 59-77
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  1. Hizb ut-Tahrir in Kyrgyzstan as Presented in Vecherniy Bishkek: A Radical Islamist Organization through the Eyes of Kyrgyz Journalists
  2. pp. 79-97
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  1. The Future of Internet Media in Uzbekistan: Transformation from State Censorship to Monitoring of Information Space since Independence
  2. pp. 99-121
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  1. Journalistic Self-Censorship and the Tajik Press in the Context of Central Asia
  2. pp. 123-139
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  1. Part 3: Trans-Regional Perspectives
  2. p. 141
  1. Loyalty in the New Authoritarian Model: Journalistic Rights and Duties in Central Asian Media Law
  2. pp. 143-160
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  1. Ethnic Minorities and the Media in Central Asia
  2. pp. 161-183
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  1. Journalists at Risk: The Human Impact of Press Constraints
  2. pp. 185-198
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  1. International Broadcasting to Uzbekistan: Does It Still Matter?
  2. pp. 199-214
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  1. Part 4: Journalism Education and Professionalism
  2. p. 215
  1. Journalism Education and Professional Training in Kazakhstan: From the Soviet Era to Independence
  2. pp. 217-232
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  1. Professionalism among Journalists in Kyrgyzstan
  2. pp. 233-243
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  1. Part 5: New Media, New Frontiers
  2. p. 245
  1. Internet Libel Law and Freedom of Expression in Tajikistan
  2. pp. 247-262
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  1. Blogging Down the Dictator? The Kyrgyz Revolution and Samizdat Web Sites
  2. pp. 263-286
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  1. Conclusion: Through the Crystal Ball
  2. pp. 287-293
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 295-299
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781609172282
Print ISBN
9781611860054
MARC Record
OCLC
778436391
Pages
400
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
N
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