In this Book

Long Is the Way and Hard
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Celebrating its one-hundredth anniversary in February 2009, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) has been the leading and best-known African American civil rights organization in the United States. It has played a major, and at times decisive, role in most of the important developments in the twentieth century civil rights struggle. Drawing on original and previously unpublished scholarship from leading researchers in the United States, Britain, and Europe, this important collection of sixteen original essays offers new and invaluable insights into the work and achievements of the association. The first part of the book offers challenging reappraisals of two of the NAACP’s best-known national spokespersons, Walter White and Roy Wilkins. Other essays analyze the association’s cultural initiatives and the key role played by its public-relations campaigns in the mid 1950s to counter segregationist propaganda and win over the hearts and minds of American public opinion in the wake of the NAACP’s landmark legal victory in Brown v. Board of Education. Others provide thought-provoking accounts of the association’s complex and difficult relationship with Martin Luther King, the post–World War II Civil Rights movement, and Black Power radicals of the 1960s.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-xiv
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  1. The NAACP in Historiographical Perspective
  2. pp. xv-xxviii
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  1. I. The NAACP at the National Level
  2. p. 1
  1. 1. “All Shadows Are Dark”: Walter White, Racial Identity, and National Politics
  2. pp. 3-14
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  1. 2. In Harlem and Hollywood: The NAACP's Cultural Campaigns, 1910-1950
  2. pp. 15-27
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  1. 3. “A Gigantic Battle to Win Men’s Minds”: The NAACP's Public Relations Department and Post-Brown Propadanda
  2. pp. 29-42
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  1. 4. Leading from the Back: Roy Wilkins's Leadership of the NAACP
  2. pp. 43-58
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  1. 5. Uneasy Alliance: The NAACP and Martin Luther King
  2. pp. 59-74
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  1. 6. The NAACP and the Challenges of 1960s Radicalism
  2. pp. 75-85
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  1. II. The NAACP at the State, City, and Local Levels
  2. p. 87
  1. 7. The Falls Church Colored Citizens Protective League and the Establishment of Virginia’s First Rural Branch of the NAACP
  2. pp. 89-103
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  1. 8. “To Hope Till Hope Creates”: The NAACP in Alabama, 1913-1945
  2. pp. 105-120
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  1. 9. “It’s Worth One Dollar to Get Rid of Us”: Middle-Class Persistence and the NAACP in Louisiana, 1915-1945
  2. pp. 121-134
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  1. 10. “In No Event Shall a Negro Be Eligible”: The NAACP Takes on the Texas All-White Primary, 1923-1944
  2. pp. 135-153
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  1. 11. Tensions in the Relationship between Local and National NAACP Branches: The Example of Detroit, 1919-1941
  2. pp. 155-168
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  1. 12. The Chicago NAACP: A Century of Challenge, Triumph, and Inertia
  2. pp. 169-183
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  1. 13. The NAACP in California,1914–1950
  2. pp. 185-199
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  1. 14. “Your Work Is the Most Important, but without Branches There Can Be No National Work”: Cleveland's Branch of the NAACP, 1929-1968
  2. pp. 201-218
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  1. 15. “They Say . . . New York Is Not Worth a D——to Them”: The NAACP in Arkansas, 1918-1971
  2. pp. 219-234
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  1. A Chronology of the NAACP
  2. pp. 235-246
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 247-297
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 299-302
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 303-313
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