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Indiana University Press
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Yosefa Loshitzky challenges the utopian notion of a post-national "New Europe" by focusing on the waves of migrants and refugees that some view as a potential threat to European identity, a concern heightened by the rhetoric of the war on terror, the London Underground bombings, and the riots in Paris's banlieues. Opening a cinematic window onto this struggle, Loshitzky determines patterns in the representation and negotiation of European identity in several European films from the late 20th and early 21st centuries, including Bernardo Bertolucci's Besieged, Stephen Frears's Dirty Pretty Things, Mathieu Kassovitz's La Haine, and Michael Winterbottom's In This World, Code 46, and The Road to Guantanamo.

Table of Contents

  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction Screening Strangers in Fortress Europe
  2. pp. 1-13
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  1. 1 Journeys of Hope to Fortress Europe: Cross-Border and Migratory Films
  2. pp. 14-44
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  1. 2 Cities of Hope: The Cinematic Cityscapes of Fortress Europe
  2. pp. 45-76
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  1. 3 The White Continent Is Dark: Migration and Miscegenation in Bernardo Bertolucci’s Besieged (1998)
  2. pp. 77-93
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  1. 4 Intifada of the Banlieues: La Haine Revisited
  2. pp. 94-116
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  1. 5 The Camp Trilogy: Michael’s Winterbottom’s In This World, Code 46, and The Road to Guantanamo
  2. pp. 117-141
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  1. Afterword: Beyond Strangers and Post-Europe
  2. pp. 142-152
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 153-200
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 201-214
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