Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

I wish to thank The Leverhulme Trust for awarding me a generous grant to work from January 2004 to March 2005 as a Leverhulme Trust Visiting Professor in the Programme of MA in Film Studies at University College London (UCL). Unfortunately (as I explain in the Afterword), due to health problems I could not ...

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Introduction Screening Strangers in Fortress Europe

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pp. 1-13

In Thomas Mann’s monumental novel Doctor Faustus (1947), written during his American exile, the protagonist, Adrian Leverkuhn, as the modern Faust, embodies the moral dilemma and culpability of the German nation. Mann writes: “It stands wholly and entirely at the service of the regime which brought us into this war, ...

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1 Journeys of Hope to Fortress Europe: Cross-Border and Migratory Films

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pp. 14-44

In this chapter, I attempt to address some of the prominent cultural motifs, metaphors, and tropes in some significant films of the contemporary migrant and diasporic European cinema. This cinema has become a recent site of articulation of Europe’s new sociocultural space, shaped and negotiated by the experience ...

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2 Cities of Hope: The Cinematic Cityscapes of Fortress Europe

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pp. 45-76

If the history of Europe is, as Saskia Sassen argues,1 the history of migration to Europe, and as most of this migration has ended up in Europe’s big cities, then perhaps the history of Europe needs to be rewritten from the point of view of its cities rather than its nation-states.2 Indeed, contemporary European migrant ...

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3 The White Continent Is Dark: Migration and Miscegenation in Bernardo Bertolucci’s Besieged (1998)

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pp. 77-93

The European capital, now a space of miscegenation and multiculturalism, is also perceived ambivalently, as a place that pollutes the country, the “body” of the nation. The city, according to this racist and nationalistic view, poses a danger to the homogenous and “authentic” national culture. It is the other within. ...

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4 Intifada of the Banlieues: La Haine Revisited

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pp. 94-116

Mathieu Kassovitz’s La Haine, which came out in 1995 and regained new life and “surplus value” during the 2005 and 2007 riots in France, chronicles, in mock-documentary fashion, one day in the life of three male youths from a banlieue (a rough, housing estate/housing project near Paris): the black Hubert ...

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5 The Camp Trilogy: Michael’s Winterbottom’s In This World, Code 46, and The Road to Guantanamo

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pp. 117-141

La Haine (1995) envisioned the time bomb buried in the banlieue. This time bomb was demonstrated in a typically French manner through mass demonstrations and riots. Eventually, however, the banlieue’s arch-enemy, Nicolas Sarkozy, was elected as France’s president in May 2007.1 In Britain, the metaphorical ticking ...

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Afterword: Beyond Strangers and Post-Europe

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pp. 142-152

In January 2005, I had a spine operation. About two months later, on a bright sunny, afternoon, while I was still recovering from the surgery and visibly disabled (I was walking very slowly and limping), I took a walk near my house in Crouch End in North London. Behind me I could hear two female teenagers ...

Notes

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pp. 153-200

Index

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pp. 201-214