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The Study of Signed Languages
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In 1999, many of today’s notable researchers assembled at a special conference in honor of William C. Stokoe to explore the remarkable research that grew out of his original insights on American Sign Language. The Study of Signed Languages presents the fascinating findings from that conference. Part 1, Historical Perspectives, begins with a description of the decline of sign language studies in the 1800s. Past research on signed languages and its relationship to language origins theory follows, along with a consideration of modality and conflicting agendas for its study. In Part 2, Language Origins, the first entry intrigues with the possibility that sign language could answer conundrums posed by Noam Chomsky’s linguistic theories. The next essay considers how to build a better language model by citing continuity, ethology, and Stokoe’s work as key elements. Stokoe’s own research on the gestural theory of language origins is examined in the section’s closing chapter. Part 3, Diverse Populations, delineates the impact of sign language research on black deaf communities in America, on deaf education, on research into variation in sign language, and even on sign communication and the motor functioning of autistic children and others. In its wide-ranging, brilliant scholarship, The Study of Signed Languages serves as a fitting tribute to William C. Stokoe and his work.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. viii-ix
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  1. Preface: William C. Stokoe and the Study of Signed Languages
  2. pp. xi-xix
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  1. Introduction: Bill Stokoe: An ASL Trailblazer
  2. pp. 1-6
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  1. Part 1: Historical Perspectives
  2. p. 7
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 9-11
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  1. 1. The Curious Death of Sign Language Studies in the Nineteenth Century
  2. pp. 13-34
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  1. 2. Historical Observations on the Relationship Between Research on Sign Languages and Language Origins Theory
  2. pp. 35-52
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  1. 3. Modality Effects and Conflicting Agendas
  2. pp. 53-81
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  1. Part 2: Language Origins
  2. p. 83
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 85-87
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  1. 4. Does Sign Language Solve the Chomsky Problem?
  2. pp. 89-99
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  1. 5. Continuity, Ethology, and Stokoe: How to Build a Better Language Model
  2. pp. 100-117
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  1. 6. William C. Stokoe and the Gestural Theory of Language Origins
  2. pp. 118-130
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  1. Part 3: Diverse Populations
  2. p. 131
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 133-136
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  1. 7. The Impact of Variation Research on Deaf Communities
  2. pp. 137-160
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  1. 8. The Impact of Sign Language Research on Black Deaf Communities in America
  2. pp. 161-171
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  1. 9. Bilingualism and the Impact of Sign Language Research on Deaf Education
  2. pp. 172-189
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  1. 10. Sign Communication Training and Motor Functioning in Children with Autistic Disorder and in Other Populations
  2. pp. 190-212
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  1. 11. Gesture and the Nature of Language in Infancy: The Role of Gesture as a Transitional Device En Route to Two-Word Speech
  2. pp. 213-246
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  1. Concluding Thoughts: The Future of American Sign Language
  2. pp. 247-261
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 263-277
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