Cover

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Title

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Copyright

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CONTENTS

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Foreword by Wade Hall

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pp. vii-xiv

In the decade following the appearance of his first short story in Century in 1892, John Fox, Jr. published numerous short stories in popular national magazines; two collections of stories, A Cumberland Vendetta and Other Stories (1895), and Hell-fer-Sartain and Other Stories (1897); a Spanish-American War novel, Crittenden (1900); and a volume of personal essays, Bluegrass and Rhododendron (1901). ...

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CHAPTER I. TWO RUNAWAYS FROM LONESOME

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pp. 3-10

THE days of that April had been days of mist and rain. Sometimes, for hours, there would come a miracle of blue sky, white cloud, and yellow light, but always between dark and dark the rain would fall and the mist creep up the mountains and steam from the tops-only to roll together from either range, drip back into the valleys, and lift, straightway, as mist ...

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CHAPTER II. FIGHTING THEIR WAY

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pp. 11-26

TWICE, during the night, Jack roused him by trying to push himself farther under the blanket and Chad rose to rebuild the fire. The third time he was awakened by the subtle prescience of dawn and his eyes opened on a flaming radiance in the east. Again from habit he started to spring hurriedly to his feet and, again sharply conscious, he lay down again. There ...

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CHAPTER III. A "BLAB SCHOOL" ON KINGDOM COME

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pp. 27-44

CHAD was awakened by the touch of a cold nose at his ear, the rasp of a warm tongue across his face, and the tug of two paws at his cover. "Git down, Jack!" he said, and Jack, with a whimper of satisfaction, went back to the fire that was roaring up the chimney, and a deep voice laughed and called: "I reckon you better git up, little man!" ...

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CHAPTER IV. THE COMING OF THE TIDE

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pp. 45-53

WHILE the corn grew, school went on and, like the corn, Chad's schooling put forth leaves and bore fruit rapidly. The boy's mind was as clear as his eye and, like a mountain-pool, gave back every image that passed before it. N at a word dropped from the master's lips that he failed to hear and couldn't repeat, and, in a month, he had put Dolph and Rube, ...

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CHAPTER V. OUT OF THE WILDERNESS

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pp. 54-62

... Already Chad had schooled himself for the parting with Jack, and but for this he must-little man that he was-have burst into tears. As it was, the lump in his throat stayed there a long while, but it passed in the excitement of that mad race down the river. The old Squire had never known such a tide. ...

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CHAPTER VI. LOST AT THE CAPITAL

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pp. 63-67

IT had been arranged by the school-master that they should all meet at the railway station to go home, next day at noon, and, as the Turner boys had to help the Squire with the logs at the river, and the school-master had to attend to some business of his own, Chad roamed all morning around the town. So engrossed was he with the people, and the sights and sounds ...

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CHAPTER VII. A FRIEND ON THE ROAD

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pp. 68-76

RAIN fell that night-gentle rain and warm, for the south wind rose at midnight. At four o'clock a shower made the shingles over Chad rattle sharply, but without wakening the lad, and then the rain ceased; and when Chad climbed stiffly from his loft-the world was drenched and still, and the dawn was warm, for spring h~d come that morning, and Chad ...

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CHAPTER VIII. HOME WITH THE MAJOR

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pp. 77-88

AHEAD of them, it was Court Day in Lexington. From the town, as a centre, white turnpikes radiated in every direction like the strands of a spider's web. Along them, on the day before, cattle, sheep, and hogs had made their slow way. Since dawn, that morning, the fine dust had been rising under hoof and wheel on everyone of them, for Court Day is yet the" great day of every month throughout the Bluegrass. ...

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CHAPTER IX. MARGARET

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pp. 89-100

... And Chad looked around. He went to the barn to see his old mare and the Major's horses, and to the kennels, where the fox-hounds reared against the palings and sniffed at him curiously; he strolled about the quarters, where the little pickaninnies were playing, and out to the fields, where the servants were at work under the overseer, Jerome Conners, a tall, thin ...

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CHAPTER X. THE BLUEGRASS

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pp. 101-104

... No humor in that phrase to the Bluegrass Kentuckian! There never was-there is none now. To him, the land seems in all the New WorId, to have been the, pet shrine of the Great Mother herself. She fashioned it with loving hands. She shut it in with a mighty barrier of mighty mountains to keep the mob out. She gave it the loving clasp of a mighty river, and ...

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CHAPTER XI. A TOURNAMENT

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pp. 105-116

ON Sunday, the Major and Miss Lucy took Chad to church -a country church built of red brick and overgrown with ivy -and the sermon was very short, Chad thought, for, down in the mountains, the circuit-rider would preach for hours-and the deacons passed around velvet pouches for the people to drop money in, and they passed around bread, of which nearly everybody took a pinch, and a silver goblet with wine, from ...

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CHAPTER XII. BACK TO KINGDOM COME

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pp. 117-126

IT was the tournament that, at last, loosed Mammy's tongue. She was savage in her denunciation of Chad to Mrs. Dean-so savage and in such plain language that her mistress checked her sharply, but not before Margaret had heard, though the little girl, with an awed face, slipped quietly out of the room into the yard, while Harry stood in the doorway, troubled and silent. ...

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CHAPTER XIII. ON TRIAL FOR HIS LIFE

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pp. 127-138

By degrees the whole story was told Chad that night. Now and then the Turners would ask him about his stay in the Bluegrass, but the boy would answer as briefly as possible and come back to Jack. Before going to bed, Chad said he would bring Jack into the house: ...

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CHAPTER XIV. THE MAJOR IN THE MOUNTAINS

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pp. 139-151

THE quivering heat of August was giving way, and the golden peace of autumn was spreading through the land. The breath of mountain woods by day was as cool as the breath of valleys at night. In the mountains, boy and girl were leaving school for work in the fields, and from the Cumberland foothills to the Ohio, boy and girl were leaving happy holidays for ...

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CHAPTER XV. TO COLLEGE IN THE BLUEGRASS

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pp. 152-163

As the school-master had foretold, there was no room at college for Jack. Several times Major Buford took the dog home with him, but Jack would not stay. The next morning the dog would turn up at the door of the dormitory where Chad and the school-master slept, and as a last resort the boy had to send Jack home. So, one Sunday morning Chad led ...

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CHAPTER XVI. AGAIN THE BAR SINISTER

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pp. 164-168

AND yet, the next time Chad saw Margaret, she spoke to him shyly but cordially, and when he did not come near her, she stopped him on the street one day and reminded him of his promise to come and see them. And Chad knew the truth at once-that she had never asked her father about him, but had not wanted to know what she had been told she must not know, ...

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CHAPTER XVII. CHADWICK BUFORD, GENTLEMAN

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pp. 169-179

AND so, returned to the Bluegrass, the mid-summer of that year, Chadwick Buford, gentleman. A youth of eighteen, with the self-poise of a man, and a pair of level, clear eyes, that looked the world in the face as proudly as ever, but with no defiance and no secret sense of shame. It was a curious story that Chad brought back and told to the Major, on the porch ...

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CHAPTER XVIII. THE SPIRIT OF '76 AND THE SHADOW OF '61

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pp. 180-186

ONE night, in the following April, there was a great dance in Lexington. Next day the news of Sumter came. Chad pleaded to be let off from the dance, but the Major would not hear of it. It was a fancy-dress ball, and the Major had a pet purpose of his own that he wanted gratified, and Chad had promised to aid him. That fancy was that Chad should go in ...

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CHAPTER XIX. THE BLUE OR THE GRAY

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pp. 187-194

IN the far North, as in the far South, men had but to drift with the tide. Among the Kentuckians, the forces that moulded her sons-Davis and Lincoln-were at war in the State, as they were at war in the nation. By ties of blood, sympathies, institutions, Kentucky was bound fast to the South. Yet, ten ...

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CHAPTER XX. OFF TO THE WAR

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pp. 195-203

THROUGHOUT that summer Chad fought his fight, daily swaying this way and that-fought it in secret until the phantom of neutrality faded and gave place to the grim spectre of war-until with each hand Kentucky drew a sword and made ready to plunge both into her own stout heart. When Sumter ...

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CHAPTER XXI. MELISSA

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pp. 204-215

SHORTLY after dusk, that night, two or three wagons moved quietly out of Lexington, under a little guard with guns loaded and bayonets fixed. Back at the old Armory-the home of the "Rifles" -a dozen youngsters drilled vigorously with faces in a broad grin, as they swept under the motto of the company-"Our laws the commands of our Captain." They ...

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CHAPTER XXII. MORGAN'S MEN

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pp. 216-231

... Over the border, in Dixie, two videttes in gray trot briskly from out a leafy woodland, side by side, and looking with keen eyes right and left; one, erect, boyish, bronzed; the other, slouching, bearded, huge-the boy, Daniel Dean; the man, Rebel Jerry Dillon, one of the giant twins. ...

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CHAPTER XXIII. CHAD CAPTURES AN OLD FRIEND

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pp. 232-247

MEANWHILE Morgan was coming on-led by the two videttes in gray-Daniel Dean and Rebel Jerry Dillon--coming on to meet Kirby Smith in Lexington after that general had led the Bluegrass into the Confederate fold. They were taking short cuts through the hills now, and Rebel Jerry was guide, for he had joined Morgan for that purpose. Jerry had long ...

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CHAPTER XXIV. A RACE BETWEEN DIXIE AND DAWN

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pp. 248-269

BUT the sun sank next day from a sky that was aflame with rebel victories. It rose on a day rosy with rebel hopes, and the prophetic coolness of autumn was in the early morning air when Margaret in her phaeton moved through the front pasture on her way to town-alone. She was in high spirits and ...

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CHAPTER XXV. AFTER DAWS DILLON–GUERILLA

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pp. 270-278

ONCE more, and for the last time, Chadwick Buford jogged along the turnpike from the Ohio to the heart of the Bluegrass. He had filled his empty shoulder-straps with two bars. He had a bullet wound through one shoulder and there was a beautiful sabre cut across his right cheek. He looked the soldier ...

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CHAPTER XXVI. BROTHER AGAINST BROTHER AT LAST

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pp. 279-288

IT was the first warm day of spring and the sunshine was very soothing to Melissa as she sat on the old porch early in the afternoon. Perhaps it was a memory of childhood, perhaps she was thinking of the happy days she and Chad had spent on the river bank long ago, and perhaps it was the sudden thought ...

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CHAPTER XXVII. AT THE HOSPITAL OF MORGAN'S MEN

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pp. 289-294

IN May, Grant simply said-Forward! The day he crossed the Rapidan, he said it to Sherman down in Georgia. After the battle of the 'Vilderness he said it again, and the last brutal resort of hammering down the northern buttress and sea-wall of the rebellion-old Virginia-and Atlanta, the keystone of the ...

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CHAPTER XXVIII. PALL-BEARERS OF THE LOST CAUSE

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pp. 295-300

THE rain was falling with a steady roar when General Hunt broke camp a few days before. The mountain-tops were black with thunder-clouds, and along the muddy road went Morgan's Men-most of them on mules which had been taken from abandoned wagons when news of the surrender came-without saddles and with blind bridles or rope halters-the rest ...

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CHAPTER XXIX. MELISSA AND MARGARET

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pp. 301-304

THE early spring sunshine lay like a benediction over the Dean household, for Margaret and her mother were home from exile. On the corner of the veranda sat Mrs. Dean, where she always sat, knitting. Under the big weeping willow in the garden was her husband's grave. When she was not seated near it, ...

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CHAPTER XXX. PEACE

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pp. 305-319

IT was strange to Chad that he should be drifting toward a new life down the river which once before had carried him to a new world. The future then was no darker than now, but he could hardly connect himself with the little fellow in coon-skin cap and moccasins who had floated down on a raft so many years ago, when at every turn of the river his eager eyes looked ...

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CHAPTER XXXI. THE WESTWARD WAY

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pp. 320-322

MOTHER TURNER was sitting in the porch with old Jack at her feet when Chad and Dixie came to the gate-her bonnet off, her eyes turned toward the West. The stillness of death layover the place, and over the strong old face some preternatural sorrow. She did not rise when she saw Chad, she did not ...