Contents

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p. v

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. vi-ix

"This book is for you if you are a newcomer to Oklahoma, a gardener, a Scout or 4-H or Campfire leader, a schoolteacher, or a parent. In it, you will find pictures of Oklahoma wildflowers growing where nature put them, along roadsides, in parks and fields, and in your own backyard."

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How to Use This Book

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pp. x-xiii

"When I started compiling the photographs for this book, I was simultaneously working with the Oklahoma Native Plant Society, the University of Oklahoma’s Bebb Herbarium, The Nature Conservancy’s Oklahoma chapter, the Oklahoma State Fair as judge of the 4-H..."

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A Word about Collecting

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pp. xiv-xvii

"There are, in the simplest terms, three kinds of plant collectors: botanists who make collections for plant research collections, called herbaria; gardeners who bring home interesting wild plants for their own satisfaction; and commercial collectors, who dig wild plants for resale. I am one of the first kind, as I collect Oklahoma plants,..."

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Oklahoma Wildflower Families

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pp. xviii-15

"Oklahoma has 14 species in 3 genera of water plantains, well named because all are found in water or mud. They are plants with milky sap and often showy, 3-petaled white flowers. All surfaces are smooth, and the fruits are simple achenes (small, hard fruits with a single seed). See page 17."

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Oklahoma Wildflowers

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pp. 16-216

"This native plant has leaves that are thrust into the air from submerged roots and are up to 20 inches long. They are broadly arrow-shaped. The inflorescence (part to which the flowers or fruits are attached) is usually..."

Glossary

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pp. 217-218

Bibliography

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pp. 219-220

Name Index

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pp. 221-228

Color Index

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pp. 229-239