Contents

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p. v

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Acknowledgments

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p. vii

After being out-of-print for nearly 20 years, and outrageously high prices being paid for dog-eared, first edition copies, it is a joy to again have Field Guide to Wildflowers of Nebraska and the Great Plains riding along on car seats or in backpacks as wildflower enthusiasts explore prairies, ...

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Conservation of Wildflowers

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pp. 1-4

Half a century ago, ranch children in the northern Sandhills could pick a bouquet of blowout penstemon for their mother to put in a vase in the kitchen window. Farm children along the Missouri River in southeastern Nebraska ...

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Nebraska’s Wildflower Regions

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pp. 5-12

The Great Plains is an enormous region where prairies are the dominant vegetation. Even before settlers began to control wildfires — a natural element of prairies discouraging the establishment of trees — there were wooded areas on the ...

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How to Use This Field Guide

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pp. 13-18

As with the first edition, the second edition of this field guide is designed to help wildflower enthusiasts identify the common wildflowers encountered in Nebraska and elsewhere across the Great Plains. It is a visual identification guide to some of the region’s showiest and ...

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Green Flowers

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pp. 19-24

Native perennial growing from thick, vertical rootstock and woody crown producing lateral roots. Usually several stems, often forming a clump in older plants; erect or lower portions reclining on the ground, slender to stout, usually not branched, 1–2 feet tall. Leaves ...

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White Flowers

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pp. 25-92

Native perennial, 6–12 inches tall, growing from a stout, horizontal rhizome up to 1 inch thick with fibrous rootlets. Leaves on long, erect stalks rising from the rhizome; leaf blade rolled around flower stalk, spreading to a lobed, roughly circular or kidney shape, 3–8 inches across; ...

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Yellow Flowers

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pp. 93-148

... older plants; linear-oblong, thickish; upper surface gray-green, underside silvery, both sides woolly with hairs; 1–3 inches long, less than .5 inch wide. Small, sulphur yellow flowers in a tight cluster (an umbel) about .5 inch across above a whorl of small ...

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Orange to Red Flowers

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pp. 149-156

Called black perfume plant by the Omaha and Ponca, its seeds were crushed, often by chewing, and used as a love charm. The paste was spread on clothes where the fragrance persisted, reportedly reviving in damp weather. Pawnee suitors rubbed pulverized seeds in their palms and contrived to shake hands with ...

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Pink to Red-violet Flowers

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pp. 157-216

Native perennial growing from a branched caudex and woody taproot. Usually several stems, 4–24 inches long; reclining on ground with rising tips, forming a low-growing clump; usually hairy. Leaves alternate, odd-pinnately compound, 2–5 inches long. Leaflets 15–27, oblong-lanceolate to elliptic, usually less ...

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Blue-violet to Blue Flowers

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pp. 217-246

Stems slender, erect or with bases reclining on ground, usually not branched below inflorescence, sparsely pubescent, up to 16 inches tall. Principal stem leaves opposite, widely spaced, lanceolate to elliptic, on short stalks or stalkless with leaf bases somewhat clasping the stem, usually pubescent, 1–2 inches long. Flowers in loose ...

Glossary

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pp. 247-250

Illustrated Glossary

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pp. 251-256

References and Additional Reading

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pp. 268-258

Index

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pp. 259-266