TABLE OF CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

I thank the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada for a publications grant in support of this book; Concordia University for the Administrative Research Grants that allowed me to present conference papers and publish articles during the years in which I was vice-dean and dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science; and the ...

read more

INTRODUCTION: Approaching Indian Country

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

Duke Redbird (Hughes 19 6 7) tells a story about a non-Indian who is driving through a maze of unmarked reservation roads, searching for the road to the Duck Lake pow wow. He sees an old Indian piling wood. He rolls down his car window and calls out, "Where's the road to the Duck Lake pow wow?" Without looking up, the old man ...

read more

1. LIVING THE HERITAGE OF LAC DU FLAMBEAU: Traditionalism and Treaty Rights

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-34

Since the earliest days of anthropology, ethnographers have tried to access the experience of the researched through biography. This is reflected in the range of writings about individual Indians, the study of whose cultures has long been at the heart of ethnography. But biographies have always been marginal to cultural analysis, an interesting ...

read more

2. RIGHTS AND WARRIORS: Media Memories and Oka

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-66

Even before the reserve near Montreal, named "Caughnawaga" by outsiders, took back its Mohawk name of Kahnawake, this community was entrenched in politics. In the book Heeding the Voices of Our Ancestors, Gerald Alfred (1995: 1) writes, "It is said that being born Indian is being born into politics," and, he adds, "being born a Mohawk ...

read more

3. POSTCARDS OF MY PAST: Indians and Artifacts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 67-88

Postcards of Indians have always attracted me. As a child growing up on the Lac du Flambeau re servation in Wisconsin, I remember watching cultural tourists search postcard racks for images of Indians, familiar faces over powered by buckskin and beadwork, horses and headdresses, portraits to supplement the memories mirrored in their ...

read more

4. INDIAN COUNTRY: Claiming Land in Native America

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-124

Shawnee tradition proclaims, "No white man knows or ever will know, where we took the body of our beloved Tecumseh and buried him. Tecumseh will come again!" (Eckert 1992: 794). His bones may be buried beneath a simple monument on Walpole Island, Ontario, or his remains might have been washed away by the flood waters of a small ...

read more

5. SACAJAWEA AND HER SISTERS: Images and Native Women

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 125-150

Near Sitting Bull's grave, there is a bullet-ridden obelisk raised in memory of the Indian woman who accompanied Lewis and Clark on their expedition across the American West. A plaque says that her name is "Sakaka-Wea, that she ‘guided’ the expedition to the Pacific Ocean, and that she died and was buried at Fort Manuel in South Dakota ...

read more

6. DANCE ME INSIDE: Pow Wow and Being Indian

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 151-174

My memories of growing up as an Indian on the Lac du Flambeau reservation in Wisconsin and your memories of Indians growing up wherever you did are rooted together in images of pow wow. Some of you may have experienced pow wow through one of a complex of activities, which Rayna Green (1988: 30) calls ...

read more

7. DRUMMING THE PAST: Researching Indian Objects

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-210

Some experiences burst upon our everyday reality with an intensity so profound and relentless that the future is forever seared to the past. The death of my father was such an experience, and the disposition of a drum in his possession became part of the pain of his passing. The compelling object is a water drum, a source of communication ...

read more

8. BLOOD BORDERS: Being Indian and Belonging

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-254

For as long as I can remember, blood borders and the conflicts of identity and recognition that spiral around them have been part of being Indian, and negotiating these borders has been a factor of daily life. In Indian Country, tribal or band membership matters, and it is entangled with Indian blood in a maze of ancestries and endorsements, rules, and ...

read more

9. CONCLUSION: All My Relations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-258

He looks exhausted sitting alone in front of a white picket fence, one hand upon his stick. His face is gouged by time, unshaven, white hair unkempt, his medicine pouch barely visible beneath his shirt . Bearskin. I know the power of his name only through the storied memories of other Indians in Lac du Flambeau, but I've carried his postcard ...

REFERENCES

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-282

INDEX

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 283-293