Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

In 1992 I held an internship in the India section of the Department of Oriental Antiquities at the British Museum. Every day, walking to work, I would pass 48 Bedford Square, the London house where the Indian reformer and staunch opponent of Hindu "idolatry" Rammohun Roy lived for much of the last year of his life in 1833. I had been studying the writings of Rammohun, and I...

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

I would like to express my gratitude to professors Richard P. Hayes and Katherine K. Young of the Faculty of Religious Studies, McGill University. I am indebted to Dr. Dermot Killingley of the University of Newcastle in England for suggestions and for sending me photocopied materials on Rammohun Roy. Dr. J.E. Llewellyn of Southwest Missouri State University sent...

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Note on Orthography

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pp. ix-x

My transliteration of Sanskrit terms follows standard international usage. For the sake of simplicity, I have omitted diacritical marks from the names of the two reformers: hence, Rammohun Roy and Dayananda Sarasvati for Ràmamohana Ràya and Dayànanda Sarasvatã. Similarly, Brahmo Samaj and Arya Samaj are...

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Introduction: Hindu Iconoclasts: An Anomaly?

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pp. 1-12

In 1838, seventeen years after the words above were published in Calcutta by Rammohun Roy, and in an entirely different context, a fourteen-year-old brahmin boy from a small town in Gujarat accompanied his father to an all-night vigil at a Shiva temple. Sometime after midnight when his father and even the temple priests had been unable to resist falling asleep, the boy was...

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One: History of Image-Worship in India

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pp. 13-42

Although popular (Western) opinion associates India with images, both Rammohun Roy and Dayananda Sarasvati claimed that original Hinduism (which for them was Vedic) was purely aniconic. A claim about the time of origins is a tacit appeal for a return to the true, the pure, the...

Two: Rammohun Roy

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pp. 43-64

Three: Dayananda Sarasvati

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pp. 65-90

Four: Rammohun and Dayananda

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pp. 91-118

Five: Hindu Iconoclasm: Cross-Cultural Dimensions?

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pp. 119-138

Notes

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pp. 139-153

Bibliography

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pp. 155-166

Index

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pp. 167-172

Further Series Titles

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