Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. iii-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments are due first to the Henry Bonham Carter Will Trust for permission to publish Nightingale original manuscripts, and indeed for treating Nightingale material generally as being in the public domain. To the owners of Nightingale manuscripts...

Dramatis Personae

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p. ix

List of Illustrations

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p. x

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Florence Nightingale: A Précis of Her Life

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pp. xi-xii

Florence Nightingale was born in Florence 12 May 1820 of wealthy English parents whose extended European wedding trip included stays in Naples (where her older sister was born and given the Greek name of that city, Parthenope) and Florence...

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Introduction to Volume 7

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pp. 1-4

European Travels goes back to the themes of the first volume, Life and Family, relating correspondence primarily with her family—a large extended family—much of it from Florence Nightingale’s youth (teens and twenties). The European trip of...

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Key to Editing

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pp. 5-8

All the manuscript material in the Collected Works has been carefully transcribed and verified (see the electronic text for a full description of the process). Remaining illegible words and passages are so indicated, with [illeg], or [?] inserted to indicate our best...

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European Trip, 1837-39

The Nightingales left for France from Southampton 8 September 1837, travelling by roomy carriage down to the Pyrenees. An old soldier of Napoleon1 showed them the castle at Blaye and told them stories of the campaigns in which he had fought. He told them that...

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Nice, 1837

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pp. 11-14

Editor: The material following alternates extracts from Florence Nightingale’s missing notebooks (indicated O’Malley), extracts from Frances Nightingale’s diary (Claydon House Bundle 67/1), W.E. Nightingale’s difficult-to-read notebook (Claydon House Bundle 30) and other family letters, which are footnoted. At that time Italy was...

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Italy, 1838

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pp. 14-32

The Nightingales arrived in Genoa 13 January 1838 and stayed until 14 Februar y, attending balls, the opera, visiting people and places, and themselves giving a successful soirée. Nightingale’s notebook records the desire to see Lucrezia Borgia8 ever y night of her life: ‘‘so beautiful, so affecting, so enchanting; how could one ever wish for anything else...

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Geneva, 1838

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pp. 32-44

Editor: O’Malley describes the situation in Geneva as the Nightingales encountered it in the summer of 1838, meeting the Italian exiles from the failed insurrection of 1821 (55). Nightingale listened to their stories of suffering, imprisonment, loss of family and even torture. They...

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Paris 1838-39

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pp. 44-62

Editor: There is quite good coverage from the Paris period in surviving letters, as well as Frances Nightingale’s notebooks, which record visits to people and museums, churches attended and health problems. Again there is material, thanks to O’Malley, from Nightingale’s...

Recollections of France, 1840s

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pp. 59-62

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Travels in France and Italy, 1847-48

Nightingale, with the Bracebridges and her French maid, Mariette, travelled through France in 1847 en route to a winter in Rome. Here we have not only travel literature with amusing and interesting observations on people, places, churches...

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France, 1847, En Route to Rome

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pp. 63-78

Nightingale, with the Bracebridges and her French maid, Mariette, travelled through France in 1847 en route to a winter in Rome. Here we have not only travel literature with amusing and interesting observations on people, places, churches...

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Rome, Winter of 1847-48

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pp. 78-296

Editor: Nightingale’s Rome visit of 1847-48 was enormously important for her intellectual and spiritual development, which in turn helped to shape her political views and later work. References to this second Rome period appear frequently in the religion volumes (volumes 2-4...

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France, 1848, on Return from Rome

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pp. 296-315

Editor: The revolutions of 1848 which Nightingale and the Bracebridges first witnessed in Italy were in progress also in France when they got there on their trip back from Rome. A letter on her retur n confided her ‘‘love of revolution’’ to her Boston friends. For a time...

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Letters on Italian and Austrian Politics

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pp. 315-328

Editor: Nightingale’s suppor t of Italian independence from its Austrian oppressor naturally led her to support other subject peoples under the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The letters following immediately were written later the same year as the Rome trip but continue...

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France En Route to Egypt, 1849

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pp. 328-329

Editor: Several letters from France en route to Egypt have already been published (in Mysticism and Eastern Religions), as they dealt specifically with preparations for the Nile. Those following here deal with France itself...

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Italian Political Personalities: Cavour,Garibaldi and Mazzini

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pp. 329-339

Editor: Count Camillo di Cavour (1810-61) was the Italian independence leader, later prime minister of Piedmont, Nightingale most esteemed. He founded Il Risorgimento in 1847, the journal that called for constitutional refor ms and a united, independent Italy. He worked for...

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Malta (picture plates follow)

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pp. 339-340

Editor: Nightingale with the Bracebridges had stopped briefly at Malta en route to Egypt November 1849 (see Mysticism and Eastern Religions 4:133-42 for her observations). They stopped there also en route to the Crimea in 1854, when Mr Bracebridge rushed the nurses on a...

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Later Reminiscences of Italy

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pp. 341-349

Real friendship perseveres and is never discouraged. Of it I give you proof, my dear Florence, by writing you letter after letter even though in eight years I have but once received direct news from you and then...

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Greece, 1850

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pp. 351-440

In contrast with the comprehensive publication of Nightingale’s letters from Rome, almost none of her many, lengthy and interesting letters from Greece have been published to date. One set of her diary entries from the Greek trip (the continuation of her...

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Later Letters and Notes on Greece

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pp. 440-441

Editor: Nightingale continued throughout her working life to follow Greek affairs, although not with the same passion as Italian. Generally she found Greek political developments depressing. She only retur ned to Greece for a brief stop in Athens en route back to England from...

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Travels En Route to Kaiserswerth, 1850

The letters Nightingale wrote in Austria and Germany en route to Kaiserswerth in 1850 are among the most important for understanding her life to be found anywhere in the Collected Works. Nightingale was still visiting art museums, but now the focus is...

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Vienna, Prague and Dresden, 1850

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pp. 445-460

Source: Diary, Claydon House Bundle 460 Vienna Sunday 30 June [1850] [Hotel] Stadt London. Hofkirche Muli Sheytans in the gallery. S Stephan, the cathedral. Canova’s Monument. Prater in the rain...

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Berlin, Hamburg and Pyrmont, 1850

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pp. 460-485

Source: Diary, Claydon House Bundle 460 Berlin Monday 8 July [1850] British Hotel. Rain. Dr Hollander. Galler y. Dresden 1:30, Berlin rail 9:00. Tuesday 9 [July 1850] Museum (Génie Adorant). Hideous picture galler y of Netherlandish hells and heavens, driven through the Egyptian Museum with a flock...

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Later Letters and Notes on Germany and Austria

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pp. 485-488

My dearest brat [Bertha Smith62] The immediate occasion of this pen is purely commercial, but I hope to follow it up with a more poetic line of business. It is to ask you to give Miss Gertrude Passow £1, which we (i.e., Mrs Bracebridge and I), send to Mme Pertz at Berlin, to whom I hope Miss Passow will have the...

Kaiserswerth

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Kaiserswerth, 1850

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pp. 489-513

In 1847 (ten years after her ‘‘call to service’’) Nightingale read an annual repor t of the Deaconess Institution at Kaiserswerth and soon fixed on it as a way toward fulfilling her vocation. Her source was Christian von Bunsen, Prussian ambassador to Britain and...

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Kaiserswerth, 1851

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pp. 513-581

Editor: A massive amount of material is still available from Nightingale’s three-month stay at Kaiserswerth in 1851. What little of it that concerns nursing has been kept for the first nursing volume. Clearly, as Kaiserswerth was devoted to the health of soul and body there is...

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Correspondence on Kaiserswerth after the Visits

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pp. 581-585

Editor: To Samuel Gridley Howe in 1852 Nightingale described her experience at ‘‘an institution for Protestant deaconesses’’ as ‘‘first rate— I wish the system could be introduced in England, where thousands of women have nothing to do and where hospitals are ill nursed by a...

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Death of Pastor Fliedner, Support for Kaiserswerth and Later Reflections

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pp. 585-602

Dear, very dear friend What news you have given me. It is as if I had lost a father—he was my first master on earth. When I was almost a child, one of the first reports to fall into my hands [was of Kaiserswerth] and that determined my life. Ah you have well expressed all that one must feel on...

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Travels in England, Scotland and Ireland

The letters on England, Scotland and Ireland were drawn from a ver y lar ge number, selected for their description of places and events rather than family relationships (which of course appear also, but those letters were placed in...

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London, South of England, 1828 to 1840s

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pp. 604-674

Petersfield, awaiting the Portsmouth coach to town Before Mrs Nightingale leaves Fair Oak she should take opportunity to visit Trotton Church,2 in which is an altar tomb, covered by a choice slab of Petworth marble, 3 yards by 11⁄2 yards. On it are brasses in good...

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Water Cures, Malvern and Umberslade

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pp. 675-683

Editor: Some letters dealing with water cures are in Life and Family as their focus is on family relations. Those here (from both Great Malvern in Gloucestershire and Umberslade, near Birmingham) describe the rigours of the regime itself, with some material on the locale...

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Other Midlands Travels

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pp. 684-702

Editor: ‘‘ Aunt Mai’’ (Mar y Shore Smith) described to Florence Nightingale’s parents the economy measures imposed by Grandmother Shore at Tapton, near Sheffield, on the loss of (some) of the Shore money: ‘‘I think her economy increases with her riches. When we are alone we...

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Scotland

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pp. 702-708

Editor: The Nightingale family took summer holiday trips to Scotland when Nightingale was young, as her mother’s family, the Smiths, had during her mother’s youth. There are, however, no letters or notes from the early trips and only the briefest of hints in later correspondence...

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Ireland, 1852

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pp. 708-718

Editor: Nightingale went to Ireland in 1852 in order to get some nursing experience in a Dublin hospital, St Vincent’s, served by a Roman Catholic sisterhood. Ostensibly she was accompanying Dr and Mrs Fowler to the meetings of the British Association in Belfast. They...

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Paris Visit, 1853

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pp. 719-758

Nightingale’s visits in Paris in 1853 were on her own, planned in 1852 when her hoped-for hospital training in Dublin failed, and now for the distinct purpose of getting hospital experience with French religious orders. She stayed initially with M and Mme...

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Other Letters and Notes on France

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pp. 758-764

Editor: Further views on this period can be seen in the draft novel Nightingale wrote in the early 1850s, but never published. Some parts of it were rewritten for Suggestions for Thought, which she had printed, but again never published for circulation. In the first excerpt...

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The Channel Tunnel

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pp. 764-766

Editor: The prospect of a tunnel under the English Channel linking England with the Continent began to be seriously entertained early in the nineteenth century. The proposal that concerned Nightingale became a public issue in 1882. Her objections were overwhelmingly...

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Epilogue

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pp. 767-770

Nightingale’s life from the time she began work at Upper Harley St. in 1853 differs entirely from that portrayed over most of this volume. Post-Crimea she was both too busy with working out her calling (saving lives) and herself ill much of the time...

Appendix: Biographical Sketches

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pp. 771-776

Bibliography

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pp. 777-779

Index

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pp. 781-802