Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Environmentalism and the environmental social sciences appear to be in a period of disorientation and even transition. This collection draws together leading international thinkers to explore the notion that perhaps one explanation for the current malaise of the "politics of ecology" is that we increasingly find ourselves negotiating "technonatural" time/spaces. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

As is the case with many collective academic endeavours, this book emerged from a mixture of motives: the boredom that comes with a long summer spent reading exciting new materials but having few broader allies to engage with; a desire to think beyond the isolation and often narcissism of much academic life; and the hope of creating a context for ...

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1 Introduction: Inhabiting Technonatural Time/Spaces

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pp. 1-30

The current state of "the environmental debate" is in considerable flux at the beginning of the twenty-first century. From European Union countries to Argentina, from India to Canada, or China, Egypt, and beyond, diverse societies find themselves gripped by controversies, dilemmas, and disputes emerging from the incorporation and resistance of human and ...

Part One: Conceptualizing Technonatural Time/Spaces

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Chapter One: Governing Global Environmental Flows: Ecological Modernization in Technonatural Time/Spaces

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pp. 33-60

While until recently the problem of environmental governance could be formulated in terms of a discrepancy between a globally organized ecosystem and nation-state--based regulatory arrangements, this no longer seems adequate (Young 1994, 2000). As other contributors to this book will also observe, the environmental social sciences find themselves ...

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Chapter Two: Circulations and Metabolisms: (Hybrid) Natures and (Cyborg) Cities

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pp. 61-84

Imagine standing on Piccadilly Circus in London and considering the socio-environmental metabolic relations that come together in this global--local place. Smells, tastes, things, and bodies from all nooks and crannies of the world are floating by, consumed, displayed, narrated, visualized, and transformed. The Amazon Forest Shop and Restaurant plays to the tune of ...

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Chapter Three: The Cellphone-in-the-Countryside: On Some of the Ironic Spatialities of Technonatures

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pp. 85-104

A central theme of this book is how the purifying rhetoric of much environmentalist discourse increasingly fails to capture the complex entanglements and constructions of technologies, natures, and social life. In this chapter I develop this theme by exploring some of the complexities that surround the cellphone1 when considered in the seemingly alien ...

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Chapter Four: Living Cities: Toward a Politics of Conviviality

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pp. 105-122

Against the cartographic opposition between cities and natures in modern Western societies, the idea of urban ecology has seemed little more than a contradiction in terms. However, the spaces and species that have been erased from urban visions and values now find themselves the subject of a "greening" of urban policy that has gathered some momentum in ...

Part Two: Experiencing Technonatural Cultures

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Chapter Five: Boundaries and Border Wars: DES, Technology, and Environmental Justice

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pp. 125-148

According to a recent study, newborn babies in the United States have absorbed an average of two hundred industrial chemicals and pollutants through the mother's womb. Their umbilical cord blood contains pesticides, consumer-product ingredients (including Teflon), stain and oil repellants from fast-food packaging, clothes, and textiles, and wastes ...

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Chapter Six: Critical Mass: How Built Bodies Can Help Forge Environmental Futures

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pp. 149-165

This chapter explores how the built body can help forge environmental futures and is based on fifteen years of anthropological research on bodybuilding in the United States. In detailing the material and subjective dimensions of bodybuilding, I reaffirm what Haraway (1991, 1995) identified as the cyborg ontological state of many late-modern bodies, and I illustrate how bodybuilding practice explicitly ...

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Chapter Seven: Living Between Nature and Technology: The Suburban Constitution of Environmentalism in Australia

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pp. 167-189

A central theme of the present book is that Western environmentalists have found it increasingly difficult to orient political practice and scholarly critique in the face of technonatural complexity. The ways that environmentalists represent nature as an autonomous realm beyond culture are well documented (e.g., Braun and Castree 1998; Cronon 1996; Latour ...

Part Three: Technonatural Present-Futures

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Chapter Eight: The Property Boundaries/Boundary Properties in Technonature Studies: "Inventing the Future"

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pp. 193-213

This chapter investigates the boundary properties of technonature by probing the property boundaries of rapid "citification" and "deruralization" that is being created by transnational capitalism. It begins by reconsidering how global climate change is tied to the greenhouse gases generated by humans in their everyday lives; it considers whether these ...

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Chapter Nine: Fluid Architectures: Ecologies of Hybrid Urbanism

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pp. 215-237

Two ordinary stories: (1) Turning on my computer this morning to begin writing this chapter, I raised the blinds and was greeted with sunshine streaming through my windows--an event in Manchester in the north of England where I live rare enough to be celebrated by flinging open the ...

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Chapter Ten: A Post-Industrial Green Economy: The New Productive Forces and the Crisis of the Academic Left

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pp. 239-257

Technonatures takes off from an apparent malaise of the environmental movement. This chapter argues that a bigger problem may be a failure of the political and intellectual left to appreciate the relationship between human-development potentials and strategies for social change. I argue in this chapter that because we are in the midst of a major historical ...

Contributors

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pp. 259-263

Index

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pp. 265-266