Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

The Catholic Calumet

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-ii

Title

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. iii

Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. iv

Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. v

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Chapter 1. Spiritual Gifts: Conversion as Cross-Cultural Practice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-18

A delegation of Illinois Indians on a diplomatic mission astonished the residents of New Orleans in 1730 with their ardent participation in the Catholic ritual life of the colonial capital. The Jesuit missionary Mathurin le Petit observed that during their three-week stay “[the Illinois] charmed us by their piety, and by their edifying life. Every evening they recited the...

read more

Chapter 2. Histories: Origins and Experience

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-46

In an entry for August 1660, Jérôme Lalemant, superior of the Society of Jesus in New France, recorded in a journal that an Ottawa trading fleet arrived at the French settlements on the Saint Lawrence River. He reported that sixty canoes made the journey from Lake Superior to Montréal and Trois-Rivières, bringing a large and valuable load of furs. After they completed their transactions...

read more

Chapter 3. Geographies: Moral Landscapes and Contested Spaces

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-71

In the decades after Ménard’s mysterious disappearance, many French officials, missionaries, traders, and soldiers traveled the waterways and portages into the pays d’en haut to participate in its transformation. On 14 June 1671, Claude Allouez of the Society of Jesus and Simon François Daumont, Sieur de St. Lusson, directed an elaborate ceremony before an audience of Indians,...

read more

Chapter 4. Perceptions: Human (and Other-than-Human) Natures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-96

In April 1670, the Mesquakies welcomed the Jesuit missionary Claude Allouez to their village, Ouestatimong, on the Wolf River near modern-day Lake Winnebago. “This people came in crowds to meet us,” Allouez recorded, “in order to see, as they said, the Manitou, who was coming to their country.” Allouez arrived at the village to begin a new mission to the Mesquakies,...

read more

Chapter 5. Translations: Linguistic Exchange and Cultural Mediation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-125

The Illinois delegation to New Orleans in 1730, led by Chicagou and Mamantouensa, pleased their French hosts with the presentation of calumets and other gifts, but they truly amazed the local residents with their performances in prayer. These displays of piety were the result of decades of linguistic exchange and cultural translation. The Jesuits worked diligently and...

read more

Chapter 6. Turnings: Spiritual Transformations and the Search for Order

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-153

“I will find in New France the will of God . . . my own perfection, and the salvation of souls with much suffering.” Jesuit missionary Claude Allouez left these words in some personal writings that expressed his feelings about his work in Canada. The superior of the Jesuit missions in New France, Claude Dablon, included the papers in a letter of 29 August 1690 informing his...

read more

Chapter 7. Generations: Gender and Power

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 154-179

In the summer of 1725, the Illinois woman Marie Rouensa lay in her bed, ill and prepared to die. She called to her side the local French notary and the Jesuit Jean Le Boullenger and at least two other prominent men so she could dictate her last will and testament. This moment was an important one for her and for the community of Kaskaskia. Rouensa had been one of the most...

read more

Chapter 8. Communities: Indigenous Christianities in the Eighteenth Century

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-198

The Jesuit missionary Gabriel Marest arrived in the Illinois country in 1698. Fourteen years later, in 1712, he penned a letter from the mission of the Immaculate Conception at Kaskaskia to a fellow Jesuit in France. The lengthy document sketched a portrait of the Illinois country and its people and described the state of Illinois Christianity in the mission. The Jesuits had labored...

Appendix: A Note on Sources and Methods

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-211

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-244

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-252

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 253-255

I am grateful to have the opportunity after so many years to thank the people and institutions that offered such generous support for this project. This book came with lasting friendships, memorable conversations, adventures in Paris, Rome, Québec, and Miami (Oklahoma, not Florida), two children, and a wedding. I am thankful for all of this and more.