Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. ix

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

Following Virginia Potter’s death, the discovery of the extensive two-way correspondence on which this book is based offered the opportunity for her and her mother’s story to be examined and shared. This book would not have been possiblewere it not for the sequestration of the letters by Virginia Potter, and I am enormously grateful to her for not disposing of them and ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xliii

The correspondence in this volume records the dialogue between a Virginian mother and daughter from 1929 until 1966; the mother, Virginia Dickinson Reynolds, lived in Richmond, and the daughter, Virginia Stuart Reynolds (later Potter), in 1935 moved to England. Their letters paint a portrait of life in a particular era and within a particular socioeconomic ...

read more

Editorial Note

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xliv-xlv

Spelling that is incorrect is indicated by [sic]; erratic spelling mistakes in words normally spelled correctly have been silently corrected. Illegible words are indicated by a question mark within square brackets. Differences appear where American and English spelling vary – for example, color and colour – and these are unchanged. Similarly, there are many instances of ...

read more

Prewar Letters

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-55

Mrs. Barry German came in to see me, bringing a little cheer to the situation, also my feather and tulle – She took me to Mrs. Phillips and left me there – I walked into a room full of people, none of whom I had ever laid eyes on before – chose someone I thought was Mrs. Phillips and was introduced to her husband and their secretary, a rather stern male who handed me a large envelope full of instructions ...

read more

War Letters, September 1939–December 1941

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-120

I have not cabled you as we were asked not to cable, telegraph or telephone unless absolutely necessary. I am so glad to think you have arrived. I have heard nothing but suppose you are safely ensconced at Drummond St. I kept putting off writing to you from day to day as never knew my plans from one hour to the next – and now it has been a week since you left. I ...

read more

War Letters, December 1941–August 1945

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-232

So many things have happened since my last letter that it leaves one breathless. America has not only gone to war with Japan, but with Germany and Italy and Rumania as well! Whew – I cannot possibly know until I hear from you, but somehow I imagine that most Americans were rather relieved when things came to a head. At least now they know where they ...

read more

Postwar Letters

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-330

Soon we will start talking about the “good old days” when we were at war! First, we have the Labour Government, then cuts in our rations, soap, clothes – and now more cuts – and the bottom surely has been reached when black-out material is to be 2 coupons per yd! Our next 24 coupons usable beginning Sept. 1st must last until May – (for instance 1 coat and skirt – 18, ...

APPENDIX 1. The Changing Value of Money, 1930–65

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 331-332

APPENDIX 2. Genealogical Charts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 333-338

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 339-359