Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xi

The material in this volume derives from the 2006 George L. Shriver Lectures: Religion in American History, presented at Stetson University on January 24 and 25. The Shriver Lectures were established by Dr. George Shriver, a Stetson alumnus, to bring noted scholars to the university to speak about the influence and significance of religion in the history ...

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xv

In his role as chair of the George H. Shriver Lectures Committee at Stetson University, Mitchell G. Reddish asked me to speak on the history science and religion in America, with particular reference to the continuing debate over the teaching of evolution in public schools. At the time of his invitation, this debate had intensified with the revival of popular ...

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Darwinism and the Victorian Soul

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pp. 1-13

I have read your book with more pain than pleasure,” Cambridge geologist Adam Sedgwick wrote sadly to Charles Darwin within a week of receiving a prepublication copy of his former student’s On the Origin of Species in 1859. “’Tis the crown & glory of organic science that it does thro’ final cause, link material to moral. . . . You have ignored this link; &, if I ...

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The American Controversy over Creation and Evolution

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pp. 14-36

The American controversy over creation and evolution is primarily fought over what is taught in U.S. public high school biology classes. Virtually no one disputes teaching the theory of evolution in public colleges and universities or using public funding to support evolutionary research in agriculture or medicine. And there is no serious debate over the core evolutionary ...

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Scientists and Religion in America

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pp. 37-54

The United States increasingly relies on science and the systemic exploitation of the natural world by scientific researchers to fuel its economy, defend its borders, and enhance the health of its people. At the same time, however, the United States remains a deeply religious country where more people than ever appear to be seeking answers to fundamental ...

Appendix: Historical Surveys of the Religious Beliefs of American Scientists

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pp. 55-60

Index

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pp. 61-66