Cover

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Half Title

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Title Page

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Copyright

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

I found the document that is published here in translation for the first time in the National Archives of Canada in the late 1980s while doing research on Iroquois culture and on Iroquois-French relations. Titled ‘‘Nation Iroquoise,’’ the document was a handwritten copy of an unsigned and undated French-language ethnography of the Iroquois left by someone who had been a captive among ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

This is a small book whose creation has been quite drawn out. The major benefit of the extra time, aside from actually improving the work, has been the opportunity it has afforded me to accumulate ever greater debts of gratitude to friends and colleagues. (What sounded like pleas to ‘‘finish the damn thing’’ were, I am certain, offered to encourage me and were not signs that I had pestered ...

Part I: Context

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The Iroquois and their French Neighbors

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pp. 3-38

Hindsight has led some historians of French-Iroquois relations to posit that conflict between the two peoples was inevitable.1 However, although the early history of contact between these two groups was turbulent, there were interludes of peace, and each group came to use and rely upon the other, even if they did not fully trust them.2 There was nothing inevitable about any of this. Accommodation...

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Map: Iroquois Settlements around 1660

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pp. 4-12

When the French first met them, the people who came to be known as the Five Nations Iroquois (Senecas, Cayugas, Onondagas, Oneidas, and Mohawks) lived in an area south of Lake Ontario and bounded roughly by the Genesee River on the west and the Hudson on the east (see map). The Iroquois called themselves the Hodenosaunee (‘‘People of the Longhouse’’). Their traditions tell of their origins ...

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Nation Iroquoise and Its Authorship

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pp. 13-38

Determining the authorship of an unsigned hand-written document can be a relatively uncomplicated process if one has a clear notion of when it was penned and who might have written the document, and if one can compare the material in question with known letters and other documents left by that person. That, unfortunately, is not the case with ‘‘Nation Iroquoise.’’ It is undated and ...

Part II: The Document

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Notes on Transcription and Translation

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pp. 41-45

"Nation Iroquoise’’ was transcribed from a microfilm copy of the document held in the Bibliothéque Mazarine, manuscrit 1964. In 1931 Canada’s national archives ordered a handwritten transcript copy (National Archives of Canada, Manuscript Group 7, IV, vol. 1964). The present transcription has been checked against both the original and against the 1931 transcript. Some minor errors were...

Nation Iroquoise (French)

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pp. 46-46

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The Iroquois Nation (English)

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pp. 47-106

The first village, which is Aniers, neighbors on Orange.1 The second, which is Onneyoutte, is 25 leagues away moving uphill to the southwest.2 The third, which is Nontagué, is 18 leagues from Onneyoutte. The fourth, which is Goyogoüan, is 20 leagues from Nontagué, and the Sonnontoüans, who constitute the last villages, are removed from Goyogoüan by 12 leagues, in such a way that they occupy over 75 leagues of ...

Appendixes

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pp. 107-116

Notes

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pp. 117-136

Bibliography

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pp. 137-144

Index

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pp. 145-150